Bob’s “Pro/Amateur” blog

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    Chad Moechnig
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    Rikki
    Post subject: Bob’s “Pro/Amateur” blog Post Posted: Sat Dec 15, 2007 7:28 pm
    Instructor

    Joined: Mon Aug 09, 2004 6:56 am
    Posts: 915
    Location: Lexington, KY
    Bob the Fight Blob wrote:
    First topic here Pro/Amateur
    Come on here is a great topic that needs to be addressed. Most of the women, because there are so far and few fighters, just put on some gloves and get in the ring and become pro. I think it’s WRONG you should learn by fighting for awhile, then become pro. Every other pro sport does it, why are you exempt from the rules. I pay $20-$100 for a ticket to watch 2 women struggle with no skill. I can watch that at the monthly mud wrestling me and the guys go to. I was on the pro circuit in sports. I didn’t just wake up one morning and say and compete a pro. God I wish it was that easy but to be pro you must train and get competition.

    In my opinion there should be more amateur fighting and work your way up to be a pro. If women want to be like the guys then you better start learning from them. This is MMA or should I say Pro MMA where people buy tickets/videos and expect to see a fight.

    Well, almost out of beer so I am outta here!

    Bob
    You can’t always blame this situation on the women. Are there some fighters who made their decision this way? Of course there are. BUT a lot of women went pro with no amateur competition under their belts because of the incompetence of many amateur promoters.

    Example – You contact an amateur show about getting on their card. You tell them that you fight at 125lbs, walk around at 130, have never fought before but have been training for a year. They say “Sure, we’ll find an opponent for you!” You get a call some time down the line letting you know that you’ll be fighting some 190lb chick that has never trained in her life but has won several Toughman competitions. Hmmm…..let me think about that one. 🙄 You try this several times and the outcome is always similar. What options do you have?
    1) Fight someone who far outweighs you.
    2) Fight someone who you far outweigh.
    3) Fight someone with absolutely no training (which is an insult to the hard work you’ve put in, in my opinion).
    4) Pay out of pocket for transportation/accommodations to travel to decent amateur promotions.
    5) Fight on a Pro card that is going to attempt to evenly match you and your opponent while paying your expenses.

    What would you choose faced with those options?
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    Sako
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sat Dec 15, 2007 11:05 pm

    Joined: Tue Nov 27, 2007 4:39 pm
    Posts: 327
    There needs to be real amateur MMA like those combat sambo tournaments in Russia, enough with these cheap-ass promoters who use the word “amateur” as an excuse not to pay their fighters.
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    Maulinator
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2007 12:59 pm
    Pro Fighter

    Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2004 9:43 pm
    Posts: 451
    Location: Hawaii, fighting out of San Diego, CA
    I know for me there was no amature fighting when I started. Not where i lived anyway, at the time. And yes the same can be said for the guys. I think alot of times, even an amature women’s fight is a lot more exciting to watch than an amature or even a pro mens match.

    I think its great that now there is the opportunity for women fighters to ease their way into it the right way by fighting amature fights.
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    warrior14
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2007 1:48 pm
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    Joined: Thu Feb 19, 2004 2:08 pm
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    Location: Sioux Falls, SD
    Agreed. There was no easing in when we started. Went from fighting girls that knew nothing straight to girls that were the best. No middle ground back then. I think this will cultivate alot more competition.
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    Jitte
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2008 7:57 pm

    Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2008 6:36 pm
    Posts: 5
    Location: Illinois
    Quote:
    Agreed. There was no easing in when we started. Went from fighting girls that knew nothing straight to girls that were the best. No middle ground back then. I think this will cultivate alot more competition.
    Wow, really? By “nothing straight” do you actually mean that they used to just go in with maybe only about a year or so of training period?
    I mean, not even with any other formal martial arts training behind their one year or whatever of MMA?
    That just seems… unprofessional and pathetic…
    I’m glad we’ve moved forward more since then :).
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    Rikki
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2008 10:38 pm
    Instructor

    Joined: Mon Aug 09, 2004 6:56 am
    Posts: 915
    Location: Lexington, KY
    Jitte wrote:
    Quote:
    Agreed. There was no easing in when we started. Went from fighting girls that knew nothing straight to girls that were the best. No middle ground back then. I think this will cultivate alot more competition.
    Wow, really? By “nothing straight” do you actually mean that they used to just go in with maybe only about a year or so of training period?
    I mean, not even with any other formal martial arts training behind their one year or whatever of MMA?
    That just seems… unprofessional and pathetic…
    I’m glad we’ve moved forward more since then :).
    Not even a year for the girls who were fighting around my town. Even now there are women fighting on these small town shows that have never actually trained.
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    kaitlinrose
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2008 5:01 pm
    Pro Fighter

    Joined: Sun Nov 25, 2007 2:12 pm
    Posts: 243
    Location: Minnesota
    At some of the local shows I have seen there have been male fighters, who clearly have not trained much, fighting “professionally”. Luckily for the gentlemen, there is adequate exposure of upper level fighters that allows people to recognize that all MMA fighters are not the same.

    Female fights are far less common and the fights between women of higher skill level recieve far less exposure. A person might see one crappy women’s fight, and make a judgement of all female fighters based off of that experience. Its unfortunate, but these people would almost have to go out of their way to be proven otherwise.

    Hopefully as the advanced ladies fights receive more publicity, the public opinion of women’s fighting will change.
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