Female fighters – how did you get started in this?

This topic contains 0 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Chad Moechnig 1 year, 7 months ago.

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    Chad Moechnig
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    femalefightfan
    Post subject: Female fighters – how did you get started in this? Post Posted: Wed Feb 14, 2007 9:29 pm

    Joined: Mon Jan 15, 2007 7:45 pm
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    Question for all the female fighters here. How and why did you decide to get started in competitive fighting, be it boxing, kickboxing, mma, or some similar fighting type?

    Maybe it started as a self defense class, the challenge of it, a chance to beat on another woman, or some other reason?

    I attend a fitness center with a good boxing instruction class. The class is split about 60%/40% men/women. I’ve noticed that some of the women seem to do pretty well. That is, that can throw the requested punches quickly and hard. Some don’t seem to try very hard (they don’t extend their arms fully on the punches, they seem to be just swinging instead of trying to hit, etc). But all the women seem to think it’s social hour whenever a brief break is called. They instantly go into a girls conversation group in a corner of the ring.

    There are a couple girls who seem to do very well in class, and one of them even teaches a basic boxing class. But to the best of my knowledge, none of them have ever fought even as an amateur for 1 fight. I asked a couple of the better girls about it, and they said they weren’t interested in actually fighting.

    So I’m wondering how some of the female fighters here got their start, and why some of the better females in my class seem to try hard at the boxing, yet have no plans to actually do it even once.

    And aside from all the above questions, how long did you spend learning and training before your first fight took place?
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    MNkkgMMA
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 2007 10:19 pm
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    Joined: Sun Sep 11, 2005 7:37 am
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    Location: minnesota
    I trained for about a month before taking my first fight, and had like seven fights in my first year. Granted they were all pretty sloppy and obviously inexperienced they were fun. (in my second fight I was in a girls half guard, I accidentally closed my eyes and threw like twenty of the hardest elbows and punches I’ve ever thrown in my life, too bad every one of them missed her head and landed on the mat an inch away from her face. The ref stood us back up and I ened up getting a standing tko)

    I don’t know what makes other people fight. I can’t even honestly say what makes me fight, or why it even interested me in the first place. I’d never even seen a ufc, pride, or even one of those small local shows. I literally had no clue this sport existed until my first fight was booked (about two weeks prior to the event) I was pretty much looking at the training as self defense, physical conditioning, and a way to meet new people and make some friends. Sometimes I still think I’m insane for fighting. (usually just that few days before the fight, and especially on the walk down to the cage.)
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    femalefightfan
    Post subject: PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2007 8:33 pm

    Joined: Mon Jan 15, 2007 7:45 pm
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    Anyone else? Surely there are a few good stories to tell around here. I’d like to learn more, hopefully someone here can help me out.
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    treelizard
    Post subject: Re: Female fighters – how did you get started in this?PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2007 3:07 pm
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    Joined: Sun Jun 11, 2006 1:01 am
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    femalefightfan wrote:
    But all the women seem to think it’s social hour whenever a brief break is called. They instantly go into a girls conversation group in a corner of the ring.
    Maybe comments like this are why Liz Posener wrote in her article not to talk during class. I guess this means you shouldn’t talk during breaks either–even if the guys are talking and talking and talking all class long.

    That or train with people that realize you might take your training seriously, even if you talk during a break. 🙄
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    MNkkgMMA
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2007 4:24 pm
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    on the other hand……..this is a very hard sport to be involved in for any length of time if you can’t find a way to make it fun.
    Because I train quite a bit as of recently, it is a social time for me as well as a learning and work out time. I guess I’ve been lucky that the groups I train with are esy going and want to have fun as well. If they didn’t I’d find a different place to train.
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    treelizard
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2007 6:42 pm
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    I agree Kate, but reading FFF’s post was yet another reminder (to me) that I need to pay attention to how I carry myself in class, especially if it’s a new school or there’s a new person in our regular class…

    How many men are there that have sloppy technique, don’t try very hard, and talk during class and nobody ever blames it on their gender… And I know just as many men who take their training seriously but have no plans to compete.
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    Maulinator
    Post subject: PostPosted: Fri Mar 02, 2007 1:12 am
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    Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2004 9:43 pm
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    Location: Hawaii, fighting out of San Diego, CA
    I had been training for about a year or so before i started geting interested in competing. I didn;t even know that thye allowed women to compete ntil i took my brother to a fight on his b-day and saw a womens fight. Thats the day I decided to take it to the next level.

    From the get go I always made an extra special effort to make sure that I was taken seriously in the gym. I didn’t flirt with the other fighters, I stopped painting my nails or caring about being super feminine. Now it takes all my effort to be cosidered a woman 😆

    I did start with the “self defense” mentality, but it was more just because I wanted to try something new, I knew I wanted to try something different and had always been interested in fighting but never dreamed of being a fighter. It progressed because I started beating everyone else in the class and because I am not the bar brawler type (well not back then anyway) I wanted an avenue to test my skills.

    FFF you mentioned that some of the girls in your class seem to have no interest in competing. Most of the baddest fighters I have ever met on the planet have absolutely no interest in competing. It’s really a personal decision and has no reflection on the actual skill level.

    What about you? Are you interested in competing or have you already? What’s your story?
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    Pankration_MuayThai
    Post subject: Re: Female fighters – how did you get started in this?PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2007 1:48 am
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    Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2006 12:38 am
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    Location: Vancouver, BC Canada
    treelizard wrote:
    femalefightfan wrote:
    But all the women seem to think it’s social hour whenever a brief break is called. They instantly go into a girls conversation group in a corner of the ring.
    Maybe comments like this are why Liz Posener wrote in her article not to talk during class. I guess this means you shouldn’t talk during breaks either–even if the guys are talking and talking and talking all class long.

    That or train with people that realize you might take your training seriously, even if you talk during a break. 🙄
    Often, anyone that hasn’t done a class before doesn’t understand when it’s appropriate to talk in a class. It’s just more obvious when the person talking in class when they shouldn’t is a girl.
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    coslisa
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2007 1:38 am
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    Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2005 6:39 am
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    Location: North East England
    Went to watch an MMA show with my husband and knew I had to have a go so started training soon after. First fight was six months later.
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    XcashXmoneyX
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2007 1:26 pm
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    Joined: Sun Aug 08, 2004 10:15 am
    Posts: 236
    Location: Dayton, Ohio
    mines kind of a funny story, really. i grew up sort of lower class, and then my mom and dad both got good jobs and we moved to a house outside town with a little land. i became pretty involved in equestrian sports for a loooong time. then, my parents got divorced and i had to give up my horses and move to an apartment with my mom. it was in a pretty bad area.
    i ended up in trouble a lot, fought a lot and got arrested, and my mom worked with a guy who ran a judo school…so she enrolled me in classes there. it straightened me up a little and i did some tournaments. at one of them i had to roll with the guys and i did a decent job and someone told me i should fight…i didnt even know women did that until then.
    the rest is pretty much history.
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