Long term injuries from Training or Fighting

This topic contains 0 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Chad Moechnig 1 year, 7 months ago.

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    Chad Moechnig
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    BrawlerBitch
    Post subject: Long term injuries from Training or Fighting Post Posted: Fri Jul 28, 2006 2:51 pm

    Joined: Sun Jun 25, 2006 5:32 am
    Posts: 103
    How much thought do you put into avoiding injuries. Are you willing to deal with injuries that will bother you the older you get? Or does your love of the sport keep you from worrying about that stuff?

    Anything I have done in my life I have done with a passion, but at a cost. I totally lost the hearing in one ear from a scuba accident. Distroyed my shoulders & knees in powerlifting and a bad horse accident in the mountains that took a year to recover from. Many of my friends are going nuts that I want to fight & say over & over that I will get hurt.

    I guess that if you want to experience something bad enough, you take the chances…………………………..and get good medical insurance 🙂

    What about the ladies here? Are you cautious or do you throw caution to the wind?
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    Rikki
    Post subject: PostPosted: Fri Jul 28, 2006 3:55 pm
    Instructor

    Joined: Mon Aug 09, 2004 6:56 am
    Posts: 915
    Location: Lexington, KY
    I’m cautious in my training. No need for unnecessary roughness when you’re just learning or practicing.

    As far as all your friends saying that you’re just going to get hurt…I’m not trying to sound rude…but they just don’t know what they are talking about. When people don’t know the sport it seems brutal to them. I’m sure that the others on here will tell you that MMA is a relatively safe sport.

    You are in control of when the fight stops – no one else. If you are being submitted, you choose when it stops. If you are being hit a lot, you can make it all stop by verbally tapping. You don’t have to just hope that your corner knows you’re in trouble and throws in the towel.

    I’m not saying that there aren’t injuries in MMA; I’m saying that it’s fairly safe. There are less injuries (and fatalities) than boxing, football, and soccer.

    Definitely have your own insurance. You should find out if your gym has insurance as well. At our gym we provide insurance that will cover any accident occuring during training or at a “class related event”.
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    fight4you
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sat Jul 29, 2006 7:10 pm

    Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:03 pm
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    promoters and MMA fans all say that MMA/NHB is safer than other sports and there have been no deaths or serious injuries. That sounds like an urban myth or a publicist’s spin to me. I wonder where the hard facts are.
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    Rikki
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sat Jul 29, 2006 8:56 pm
    Instructor

    Joined: Mon Aug 09, 2004 6:56 am
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    Location: Lexington, KY
    fight4you wrote:
    promoters and MMA fans all say that MMA/NHB is safer than other sports and there have been no deaths or serious injuries. That sounds like an urban myth or a publicist’s spin to me. I wonder where the hard facts are.
    While the following article does not compare numbers with other sports, it gives a comprehensive break down of MMA injuries. Read it thoroughly because the abstract is a bit misleading, in that it is covering ALL injuries not just serious ones.

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    fight4you
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sun Jul 30, 2006 12:30 am

    Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:03 pm
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    good article though limited. interesting that it shows MMA offers more injuries of a wider type than does boxing – which is not what the promoters say
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    Rikki
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sun Jul 30, 2006 7:14 am
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    Location: Lexington, KY
    Well, I don’t know what promoters you’ve been talking to but I’ve never heard anyone say that MMA has fewer types of injuries than boxing – just less injuries than boxing. Head injuries especially.
    Google football deaths and see what you come up with. The number is actually higher than I thought it was.
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    Rosi
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sun Jul 30, 2006 7:25 am
    Pro Fighter

    Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2005 11:26 am
    Posts: 532
    Like with most sports, the vast majority of MMA injuries are not acute traumatic injuries from a particular incident, but long term chronic injuries that creep up on you from behind. The ones where you don’t always remember something you did to bring it on – you just gradually become aware that your knee / shoulder / lower back / whatever is causing you trouble.

    Fortunately there IS a lot you can do about this kind of injuries – correct training, conditioning and nutrition go a long way, and if you catch them early, they often respond well to exercise and rehabilitation.

    This is a big interest of mine, and it’s what got me into studying sports therapy / massage and now osteopathy (just finished my first year out of five). Osteopathy is a bit different here in the UK from the US in that over here we’re not qualified medical doctors as well; we specialise in the manual therapy and refer to a medical doctor where necessary.

    I’m always amazed by the number of people who will “put up with” an injury that is very treatable. When you push your body as hard as a fighter has to, regular maintainance isn’t a luxury – it’s an essential. Personally, i feel very fortunate to have found some great practitioners who do a fantastic job of keeping me in one piece
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    BrawlerBitch
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sun Jul 30, 2006 7:46 am

    Joined: Sun Jun 25, 2006 5:32 am
    Posts: 103
    Rosi, You are right about the nagging chronic injuries that people put up with that could be treated with therapy. When I was doing triathalons, I was constantly getting overuse injuries & found that deep tissue massage was the BESt way to get things healing quickly. I had money to burn and an excellent massage therapist that would really push my level of tolerance, but amaze me with the results!

    Money is tight now as the 8 hurricanes we got here in Key West did a number on my business & I am having to do some bare bones with my training expenses now. Last October I pulled a hamstring and it flairs up pretty regularly. I never would have let something like that go in the past. I’m sure 2 or 3 deep muscle massages would straighten it right out.

    A friend from Texas is sending me a 10’s unit like the Chiropractors have in their offices that electrically stimulates a contracted muscle & gets the blood flowing back again so it heals faster.

    Rikki, it must be my age,ack of flexibility & possibly overtraining, but small or chronic muscle pulls and flairing up of old injuries has me icing a whole lot!

    I think the nutrition & rest is a key part to prevention as well.
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    fight4you
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sun Jul 30, 2006 4:47 pm

    Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:03 pm
    Posts: 429
    well. White from UFC always likes to downplay the violence and injry and make it sound like it is no big deal. and with football – the injuries are usually accidental, not intentional as in mma/nhb
    Rikki wrote:
    Well, I don’t know what promoters you’ve been talking to but I’ve never heard anyone say that MMA has fewer types of injuries than boxing – just less injuries than boxing. Head injuries especially.
    Google football deaths and see what you come up with. The number is actually higher than I thought it was.
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    Rosi
    Post subject: PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2006 11:21 am
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    Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2005 11:26 am
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    You’re still just as injured whether the injury is deliberate or accidental.

    BB – tens units are good for chronic pain, but don’t really do anything for the underlying cause of the injury (there are other kinds of electrical stimulation which can have more of a healing effect, but they tend not to come in affordable hand held units 😕 )

    You’re right about ice, rest and nutrition.

    There’s also some good self massage stuff you can do which works really well. Do a search on foam roller massage.
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    fight4you
    Post subject: PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2006 6:11 pm

    Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:03 pm
    Posts: 429
    yes u are as injured either way BUT …….
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    BrawlerBitch
    Post subject: PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2006 7:18 pm

    Joined: Sun Jun 25, 2006 5:32 am
    Posts: 103
    Rosi, I just got a foam roller for my “tesior fasca something or other” on the outside of leg/hip. Thanks
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    Rosi
    Post subject: PostPosted: Tue Aug 01, 2006 5:59 am
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    Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2005 11:26 am
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    good for hamstrings too
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    meltdawn
    Post subject: PostPosted: Tue Aug 08, 2006 6:38 am

    Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 12:18 pm
    Posts: 33
    i sprained my knee about 3 weeks ago when i took someone down accidentally on top of me (major note to self: learn from that mistake). hyper-extended to the side, got the medial collateral ligament and the meniscus. i can walk ok now and can almost bend it fully. it doesn’t hurt any more, but i’ve tried to rush back into training too quick, and it’s gone out with excrutiating pain.

    can anyone tell me how long something like this takes to truly get over? mentally, i’m nursing it and i don’t know when i can stop that.
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