please someone explain where these fighter’s come from…

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    Chad Moechnig
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    feldmanfighter
    Post subject: please someone explain where these fighter’s come from… Post Posted: Mon Sep 03, 2007 6:41 am
    Amateur Fighter

    Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 1:29 pm
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    Location: New York City
    Ok, so this is what I don’t understand.

    There are all these great professional women MMA fighters who have made such names for themselves, and have built tremendous records, and have tons of experience. 14 fights, 10 fights, 20 fights, blah blah blah, you get my point…

    But where did they all come from? Seems to me people either have no experience or they have tons of experience and there really is no in between. And although I think it is tremendous that certain states are legalizing amateur MMA, other states aren’t, and it seems to be such a conflict of interest.

    I’d like to hear everyone’s opinions on whether or not you think women should hold out on going pro and try to do amateur even though there’s not a market for it…or if you all think they should just jump on the wagon.

    I predict there will be some different opinions depending on what area of the nation you come from. I’m asking because, living in the northeast, there really is limited amateur opportunity here. And no one’s gonna fly my sorry ass out west for a smoker!!! (We don’t really have those here either).

    If anyone has any suggestions on gaining experience or how to find amateur/sem-pro/smoker opportunities on the east coast that would be awesome too.

    Thing is competition is great, but I don’t want to go swimming with the sharks just to gain some experience..I’d like to keep me teeth!! (at least for now)

    Thanks girls! xoxo
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    GFC
    Post subject: PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2007 7:01 am
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    right now the amateur and semi-pro ranks are growing and will be blowing up very soon. just give it some time to get more organized, we are currently recruiting and transitioning *many* into training and fighting and there will be a lot more sanctioned events specifically for that purpose…as well as, more great new pros coming out of the woodwork…and, transitioning from muay thai and other forms as well.
    Last edited by GFC on Mon Sep 03, 2007 4:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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    Rosi
    Post subject: PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2007 12:53 pm
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    Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2005 11:26 am
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    I’m familiar with the problem, and i know how frustrating it is.

    Can’t really offer specific advice, as I don’t know your situation in any detail (and i’m not really sure i’m qualified to be giving advice, anyhow, lol)

    You’ll find it easier to get experience if you’re prepared to spend some money to do it. Maybe even be prepared to fly yourself somewhere for an event. Not an ideal situation, but think of it as an investment for the future.

    Perhaps more important than whether you’re fighting amateur or pro though is getting matched up with someone of a similar level of experience. If you (or better, your management) pick your fights carefully, then there’s no reason to jump in with the “sharks”.

    The other thing is to get as much experience of competition as possible. Grappling comps aren’t the same thing as MMA, but they’re a great way of picking up some experience and understanding of how you perform under pressure. Similarly with inter-club competitions, or even simulated fights in your gym.
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    GFC
    Post subject: PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2007 4:10 pm
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    Rosi wrote:
    The other thing is to get as much experience of competition as possible. Grappling comps aren’t the same thing as MMA, but they’re a great way of picking up some experience and understanding of how you perform under pressure. Similarly with inter-club competitions, or even simulated fights in your gym.
    prudent advice there…
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    feldmanfighter
    Post subject: PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2007 5:20 pm
    Amateur Fighter

    Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 1:29 pm
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    Location: New York City
    Yeah, you’re both right… I’m just in the frustrated mode…

    gets confusing when you train at a gym of all men — and there’s “rules” about who can fight and who can’t and when and with who and against who and for who and politics politics blah blah blah blah…

    I’ve done some grappling events — I’m enrolled in amateur metro’s and hopefully golden gloves…and I just had my first ame fight and did well…so I guess it’s all about patience.

    It’d be nice to hear about what the current pro’s did to get started and how long it took them.

    thanks again for the advice = ) and you all are perfectly qualified to be giving it!
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    GFC
    Post subject: PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2007 6:13 pm
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    sounds like you are limited within your gym. there are also many things you can do to supplement your training outside your gym, and in addition to the tournaments…but, that depends a lot on how much time and resources you have and what else is available near your location. i’ve had the equivalent of a full training gym set up at home, that way you have the freedom to train with simulated fighting/sparring all the time and accelerate your skill level that much quicker. also things like free climbing, gymnastics, specialized cqc, R.A.T. (rapid assault training) can all help as additions and supplements. nothing can replace actual fight experience, but all of those additions will help to prepare you and accelerate your conditioning and skill level for when you do fight.
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    Rosi
    Post subject: PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2007 12:45 am
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    Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2005 11:26 am
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    Quote:
    It’d be nice to hear about what the current pro’s did to get started and how long it took them.
    My first fight was in 2002. Between then and 2004 when i took time off to have a baby, I had a total of five fights – sometimes going a year between fights.

    The difficulty was always in getting opponents. Making the jump to the level where people are prepared to pay to fly you out or fly an opponent in was the tough bit.

    I also did a lot of grappling comps back then, and some semi contact sport JJ stuff which, again, is light years from MMA but it was still good experience. Looking back, i wish i’d also used the time to do some amateur boxing or muay thai as well.

    Patience is definitely the key, and using the time to get as good a foundation as you can… although i know how frustrating it is when you just want to get in there and do it.
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    Pankration_MuayThai
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2007 8:37 am
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    Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2006 12:38 am
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    Location: Vancouver, BC Canada
    march 2006-1st fight, an amateur fight. I won, but barely.

    June 2006- my 1st pro fight- lost, ko’d
    -had to heal and take some time off

    Sept 2006- Pro fight- won round 1 TKO

    Nov 2006- Pro fight- won round 1 TKO

    Dec 2006- Fought Molly- my first time with a really experienced fighter- draw

    Feb 2007- Pro Fight (she had 3 fights) won by arm bar

    March 2007- Pro Fight- vs Ginele Marquez- lost, by rnc- got beaten up 🙂

    June 2007- Pro Fight- vs Hitomi Akano- lost- round 2 arm bar- great experience!

    Aug 2007- Pro Fight- win- round 1 arm bar

    Sept 2007- Pro fight

    *I like to stay busy & get as much experience as I can.
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    Maulinator
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2007 1:50 pm
    Pro Fighter

    Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2004 9:43 pm
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    Location: Hawaii, fighting out of San Diego, CA
    I didn’t get my first fight until about 2 years after I decided I wanted to compete. I started training in 1998, and my first fight (which was pro, didn’t have am. in hawaii when I started) was in 3/2003. Then it was another year and a half before I had my next one in 11/2004 at the HNS Evolution show. Then another 6 months before I fought again in May of 2005. After that it started taking off a bit, and I would have something at least every 6 months or less on average.

    So it does take awhile to get started. There are WAY more opportunities now than there were even 2 years ago. I paid for my own travel expenses for my 2nd fight at the HNS. Well actually I had friends that donated to the cause… but I had to raise enough for both me and my corner. Sometimes you have to put yourself out there at first in order to line up opportunities for the future.

    I understand the frustration though. It was hard for everyone for years. Out of every 10 fight offers you would probably maybe get one that actually came through. There were so many backouts etc.. it was hard to get anything solid.

    Basically it comes down to this – if you want it bad enough you will find a way to make it happen. Keep at it and refuse to take no for an answer. Take risks and just jump in with both feet. After almost 10 years of chasing this dream, it is only just now really “starting to happen” for me.

    The other thing is records don’t mean everything. They can be decieving. maybe someone has a ton of fights, but they had their first fight after training for 3 months. Or vice versa – someone only has a few fights but has been training forever. A win/loss record also does not always speak for the caliber of fighter. Some of the toughest girls I have seen have had shitty records, and again vice-versa…

    I didn’t always take “smart” fights in the beginning. I took lots of fights on very short notice, against more experienced / heavier opponents, and traveled to lots of fights not having any corner, or just an inexperienced friend in my corner. Maybe not the best decision, my record suffered greatly for it. But it did give me experience, and at this point there is no fight situation that seems scary for me anymore. I don’t know that I recommend that route, but at the time I didn’t feel like I had a choice. Now you have better opportunities, so you shouldn;t be forced to step into an uncomfortable situation.

    Good luck in pursuing your dreams. Remember: There are those that watch things happen, and there are those that MAKE things happen. Be one to make it happen!
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    feldmanfighter
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2007 4:01 pm
    Amateur Fighter

    Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 1:29 pm
    Posts: 85
    Location: New York City
    I first want to thank everyone for taking the time to share their experiences with me… I pretty much have “known” all the things you mentioned… i guess I’m just so hungry right now because my first amateur fight when so well and I had been waiting for it for so long…

    I wanted to fight ame last year, and started looking hard for an opportunity. In Jersey, it is common for all the men to fight ame before going pro–its pretty much unheard of for people to jump right into the pro scene. So my coach said go look, and I did… but there was literally NO ONE to match me up with…so I just kept training and asking promoters and looking…that was in February of something two years ago… they found a few people, but then I broke my right ankle training…and when I finally healed, those people didn’t want to fight anymore…6 months later I broke my right ankle…then i moved gyms, then i moved cities, and moved gyms again…

    so two weeks ago it FINALLY happened – fight in Jersey, and I have to thank New Breed Fighters for putting that together…it was the BEST night of my life…and now I’m wondering if I’m going to have to wait another two years for another opportunity…maybe I will, maybe I won’t. Doesn’t matter I guess…I’m going to keep training regardless.

    Anyways, thanks again for all the sharing– i think it’s awesome we have a place to share and all that jazz…we can thank Debi for that, among others. And thank everyone who 5 years ago had even less than we do now who stuck to it and is showing everyone that women have what it takes and are showing me that there’s a chance! = )
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    derUbermensc
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2007 4:49 pm

    Joined: Thu Jan 26, 2006 9:10 pm
    Posts: 382
    Perhaps my two cents should be taken with a grain of salt considering I’m the only non-fighter posting in this thread, but in response to your question amateur MMA generally lacks the infrastructure to be taken seriously at this point, and this proves true even for males as a lot of the time you find promoters using the title ‘amateur’ just to save a few bucks in not paying fighters.

    In that light, I third (its already been seconded) what Rosi has put forth. Its something which should be par for the course amongst fighters, but even in the male divisions you’re constantly coming upon guys fighting guys with way more expirience or way less even at the level of the ‘big shows.’
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    GFC
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2007 10:09 pm
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    Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2007 4:01 am
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    hey some excellent stuff on this thread. also going back to what rosi mentioned, i think equal matchups at any level are key. mismatches serve no-one any good from event promoters, fighters, the audience or the sport in general. taking fights which are just a 20 second walk-through just to pad a record are a waste of time, travel, and expense imo…

    i think what’s great now (and particularly with the women’s pro divisions) is there’s a true parity amongst most of the girls and that’s what is making for so many excellent fights right now. the best are fighting the best and are all at least within a ‘range’ of being in the same league in terms of skill/experience/conditioning. on any given night fighter x who lost to fighter y could win on a different night. although there are a few exceptions, like fedor, on both the men’s and women’s side those who seem dominant can lose easier than in any other form of fighting sports where there are more dominant fighters. i think that’s what makes mma even better and more compelling, is having that greater chance that any favored fighter could possibly be upset in so many different ways.

    and on molly’s point, totally agree, cannot just go by records anymore. mma training methods are so much more efficient and widespread now that quality fighters are (and will be) coming out of virtually nowhere and transitioning more and more from various other arenas, some of those also coming into mma with more raw fighting experienced if that’s where they came from….but, all of this is outstanding for deepening the talent pool and is a big part of what is making the sport grow so much and so fast.

    so i think you are involved in the sport just at the right time, like molly said 5-10 (even 1-2) years ago the women’s game was hardly what it is right now. in fact, i cannot think of any segment of any sport that is blowing up faster right now. just hang in there and the parity at the amateur level will also continue to improve.

    take it upon yourself and management team to seek out only those equal matchups, and try not to take fights out of frustration just to get in there with opponents which are either much less or much higher level then wherever you’re at now, unless it is grappling or sparring.
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    Maulinator
    Post subject: PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2007 10:39 am
    Pro Fighter

    Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2004 9:43 pm
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    Location: Hawaii, fighting out of San Diego, CA
    One other point of advice I wanted to share was to promote yourself. Put together a “fight” resume, or in your case since you don’t have a whole lot of MMA experience, include any grappling tourneys or boxing/kb smokers. If you don’t have lots of outside experience – go get some! Enter any kind of smoker or tournament you can to not only add to your resume, but to gain ring experience. Also put together a highlight reel, again in your case since you don’t have a lot of fight reel some good training / sparring sessions. You can almost always find someone in your gym that is an aspiring filmaker or at least a film hobbiest that is looking for a new “project” and will usually help you put one together for free.

    Send this stuff out to every promoter you can find. It shows then that not only are you serious but you are professional. Jeff Osborne (hooknshoot@aol.com) has always been a good person to allow opportunities to newer girls looking to get a start. Fatal Femmes and the new WUFA are also creating opportunities for green females. Bug the shit outta them until they finally hear you and set something up!
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