thinking/not thinking while rolling

This topic contains 0 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Chad Moechnig 1 year, 7 months ago.

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    Chad Moechnig
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    treelizard
    Post subject: thinking/not thinking while rolling Post Posted: Tue May 06, 2008 10:43 pm
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    Joined: Sun Jun 11, 2006 1:01 am
    Posts: 1143
    Location: Minneapolis
    I was wondering if anybody could tell me whether they think more or less (strategy wise) as their game improves.

    Speaking for myself it’s all about finding a balance because if I think too much I convince myself nothing I try will work, but if I don’t think enough I do stupid shit or get caught in the same positions over and over again. So normally I try to be somewhere in between or if I’m rolling with someone who’s got a much better game (or is spastic or weighs a ton more) I try to pick one thing to focus/work on that day.

    I was just wondering if anybody’s notice they think less as their game improves, and also for coaches do you think your athletes who strategize less while rolling improve faster?

    Also for people who compete I’m wondering if everything changes during a fight as opposed to in the gym.
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    ornery
    Post subject: Re: thinking/not thinking while rollingPostPosted: Thu May 08, 2008 2:39 pm

    Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 6:58 pm
    Posts: 136
    [quote=”treelizard”]I was wondering if anybody could tell me whether they think more or less (strategy wise) as their game improves.

    Speaking for myself it’s all about finding a balance because if I think too much I convince myself nothing I try will work, but if I don’t think enough I do stupid shit or get caught in the same positions over and over again. So normally I try to be somewhere in between or if I’m rolling with someone who’s got a much better game (or is spastic or weighs a ton more) I try to pick one thing to focus/work on that day.

    I was just wondering if anybody’s notice they think less as their game improves, and also for coaches do you think your athletes who strategize less while rolling improve faster?

    Also for people who compete I’m wondering if everything changes during a fight as opposed to in the gym.[/quote]

    That’s an age-old principle of martial arts – you can’t think and do at the same time. What does work is to think ahead of time about a very general goal like “avoid pulling guard” or “get to their back from any position”, depending on the opponent. Then you only have to keep one thing in mind. If you try to really think, there will be little pauses where you’re not moving and your opponent will take advantage.

    To avoid making stupid mistakes, you have to drill drill drill drill drill from as many different positions as possible. Then you won’t have to think about it, it will just be reflex. Another thing that helps is to divide positions into general categories or patterns. Then drill a way of attacking when you see that pattern. Like 1 arm in and 1 arm out = triangle choke from almost ANY position, even under the sidemount. If you drill this way, you won’t need to do a lot of conscious thinking while you’re rolling.

    I train BJJ at Alliance in Atlanta with some of the best competitors in the world. They all say the same thing. Strategize about your advantages/disadvantages BEFORE you roll, and drill to recognize patterns while you’re in the game.
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    irishspirit
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sun May 11, 2008 7:46 pm

    Joined: Sun Sep 09, 2007 7:41 pm
    Posts: 144
    Location: Washington D.C.
    I know what I want to do going into every match. When you go through your gameplan perfectly to a submission it’s such an awesome feeling. It doesn’t always work out as perfectly as you prepare in your head but this approach works for me way better than just going in without a specific plan ever did.
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