This topic contains 0 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Chad Moechnig 1 year, 8 months ago.

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    Chad Moechnig
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    train
    Post subject: trainingPostPosted: Sun Apr 25, 2004 3:34 pm

    Joined: Sun Apr 25, 2004 3:26 pm
    Posts: 3
    Location: canada aurora
    hello
    i came across this forum and i think it’s interesting, i have never seen any women mma, only a few from the men’s division.

    i am a thaiboxing intrstrutor, i honestly think grappling will be difficult to apply in a real situation as well as too dangerious,unless you were very big and strong, or maybe because i don’t know any wrestling moves to made a comment, i don’t know.

    however , a few of my student express interest in grappling moves,

    so, i am offering any one here interested in learning thaiboxing, i will train you for free for a few session of simple locks etc….

    i was ranked #9 in great britain when i was fighting there.

    i live in cananda , aurora, anyone willing to help.

    thanks
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    KnockOut2
    Post subject: PostPosted: Mon Apr 26, 2004 8:03 am

    Joined: Mon Mar 01, 2004 6:19 pm
    Posts: 439
    Location: Louisville, KY
    I run a popular Kickboxing website called
    What is your name? What gym to you train/teach out of?

    I’m surprised at Muay Thai trainers who don’t see the application of grappling technique to overcome strength. From every fighter that I know who has travelled to Thailand to train, they all say that the smaller, more experienced thais (in the gym) throw them off balance and setup knees very well, without putting much strength into the grappling. They use simple. small twists, pulls and pushes with excellent timing to cause stronger fighters to bend at the waist, lose balance and fall backward, or even get dumped to the floor.

    It is easy to relate that example of technique to the use of ground grappling.

    If you’d like to see some female fighters competing…go here and get the Hook n Shoot Revolution DVD.

     

    If you are seriously looking for people who would like to trade ground technique for Muay Thai technique, then I suggest posting on  I believe they have a section for people in Canada.
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    train
    Post subject: thanksPostPosted: Mon Apr 26, 2004 12:46 pm

    Joined: Sun Apr 25, 2004 3:26 pm
    Posts: 3
    Location: canada aurora
    thank you for the reply

    but somehow it’s not working, it will log on to the general site but not the canadamma site,

    i teach on my own, i don’t own a fully equipped gym , too expensive.

    i hate the wrestling part before throwing the knees, it take too nuch energy, i teach my student based on experience, throw the knees immediately once in range, no telegraph, you know who is bruce lee?

    how do i get to your web site, i like to check it out.

    are there anyone here form canada
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    ABScene
    Post subject: PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2004 3:11 am

    Joined: Thu Apr 15, 2004 5:44 am
    Posts: 26
    I too am a Thai Boxing instructor in Canada but I also train in grappling. You are right to say you cannot make any comments because of your lack of knowledge of any wrestling moves. If you’re strictly talking Muay Thai, then the fight stops if you get your opponent on the ground anyway (as I am sure you already know); however, if you are talking about a “real situation”, most fights will end up in the clinch and possibly end up on the ground. This is where you’re going to need ground skills. I am not very big and also not inhumanly strong. Not knowing how to escape when someone is on top of you sucks. I have learned to escape quite well and can control a much larger opponent than me. (BTW you are best to learn escapes before learning locks anyway).

    FYI to get into the Canada mma part of mma.tv click on the international forum. You will see Canada listed there.
    KnockOut2: checked out Ax kickboxing website – nice. I can see it is still in the works. When do you suppose it will be finished?

    Rebecca
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    KnockOut2
    Post subject: PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2004 7:54 am

    Joined: Mon Mar 01, 2004 6:19 pm
    Posts: 439
    Location: Louisville, KY
    Well, the forum is up and running. That is the main draw right now. The extras (links database, fighter database, news) are a work in progress. This week, I am transferring everything to a new dedicated webserver. This is good news, because the rest of the site will start to develop now…also, it will be faster and I have plans to do video streaming of Muay Thai fights. It’s gonna be fun 😉

    Thanks for visiting the site.

    Train, there are two applications for standup fighters to consider in MMA. One is to avoid being taken down. Two is to be able to scramble back to your feet after being taken down. Both are necessary skills. Some fighters are good at one or the other.

    for examples of MMA fighters who are really good at getting back to their feet when they are taken down… see Chuck Lidell, Mirko CroCop (Ex- K1 fighter), Yves Edwards, Pedro Rizzo, Vanderlei Silva…One of my favorite fighters is Yves Edwards. His ability to scramble and get back to his feet is really impressive.

    For fighters who are good at preventing being taken down in the first place… Wesley Cabbage Correira, Pedro Rizzo, Mirko CroCop (also)

    I didn’t mention people who are primarily wrestlers, like Randy Couture. I think that is too obvious. I’m mainly talking about fighters who want to stand and strike who have learned these new skills to apply to MMA fighting.

    I can think of three examples of standup fighters who have been less successful at preventing takedowns or getting back to their feet after being taken down. Duane Bang Ludwig, Pete Spratt, Gilbert Yvel, Jeremy Jackson…

    Maurice Smith is an example of a Kickboxer who got good at using his guard to survive on the ground. He wasn’t very good at preventing takedowns or getting back to his feet. He would usually survive on the ground with his guard and then either get back to his feet in the next round or if the referee broke up the action and made them stand. In his legendary fight with Mark Coleman (wrestler), he beat Mark with conditioning, in very much the same way that Frank Shamrock beat Tito Ortiz. They both got taken down early…they used their guard to survive on the ground. Their cardio outlasted their opponent’s cardio and they won because of it.

    Ko2
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    train
    Post subject: nice gymPostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2004 7:57 am

    Joined: Sun Apr 25, 2004 3:26 pm
    Posts: 3
    Location: canada aurora
    hello rebecca

    i just check out your gym, did you own that gym by yourself, it is very nice.

    you are from kingston, how far is that from aurora?

    are you ranked in canada as a fighter?
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    KnockOut2
    Post subject: PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2004 8:51 am

    Joined: Mon Mar 01, 2004 6:19 pm
    Posts: 439
    Location: Louisville, KY
    That is a pretty nice gym… 3000 sq ft. Nice.

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    ABScene
    Post subject: PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2004 5:10 pm

    Joined: Thu Apr 15, 2004 5:44 am
    Posts: 26
    My husband and I own and operate the school together. We consider ourselves quite spoiled to have such a large school but we do work extremely hard to keep and obtain new students.

    Kingston is about 3 hours east of Aurora so not really close.

    I am not a ranked fighter. I have only had 4 amatuer kickboxing fights and have difficulty finding opponents. Also, because we are busy with the school, it is difficult for me to travel long distances to fight as we would have to use volunteers to look after the school for us (which we do often enough).

    As for this post, I really think it would be beneficial to you, train, to learn some ground skills. If your students are asking for it, they are probably aware that it is something they need to know.

    Ko2: sounds like you have some great plans for your website!
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    HAMA_Head
    Post subject: PostPosted: Fri May 28, 2004 2:28 pm

    Joined: Wed Feb 25, 2004 12:51 pm
    Posts: 17
    Location: Denver, Co.
    i can certainly see the benefit of BJJ on the street. even if i can’t hurt my opponent, i am able to keep myself from harm. and i have gotten quite good at making my opponents get tired. the submission i most often accomplish is a verbal submission due to exhausted opponents. i’ll take it.
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