Why do you fight?

This topic contains 0 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Chad Moechnig 1 year, 7 months ago.

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    Chad Moechnig
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    fight4you
    Post subject: Why do you fight? PostPosted: Wed May 24, 2006 5:39 am

    Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:03 pm
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    Ok, I may be opening the hornets’ nest but here goes. Girls, of all the things you can choose to do – why do you fight?

    It is a pursuit that takes a lot of time, effort and discomfort. The return is NOT big bucks and fame. You have to cross a whole lot of barriers (perceptual and real) to do it, such as 1.) “Most girls don’t like violence”. 2.) “It is not feminine and ladylike behavior.” 3.) “What’s a girl doing a guy thing for?” 4.) “Why risk your looks? “etc.

    I ask because there are many many choices that offer a longer competition window and much more reward. Look at the professional lifespan and paychecks for those women in golf, tennis, billiards, even volleyball.

    In MMA you risk much and have limited return.

    Of all the things you can choose to do why pick the dislocations, the breaks, the lacerations, the ground and pounds, the hassles, the explanations, even the answers to questions like this?

    What is the reward and what made you choose this path?
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    Mook
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed May 24, 2006 6:57 am

    Joined: Thu Apr 29, 2004 9:09 am
    Posts: 37
    I’m not a girl, but I’ve given the subject a lot of thought. Like many behaviors this is fairly atypical, just as the obssession some men have with it is.

    My guess is that there is some basic genetic predisposition that is triggered when this option reaches conscious awareness due to its current availability. I think there is a primal urge that arises in some to compete in this, notwithstanding potential injuries of the sort that most women cringe at. There is, within them, someone who wants to fight and they feel drawn to it and eventually want to do it.

    Thus I don’t think this is a case where someone says hey I’ll do that instead of playing tennis: I don’t think that many pick the sport as much as it picks them. In some cases through association with a guy or family involved in martial arts over time some may get into it that otherwise might not. But by and large I would say that these girls are “naturals,” that have felt drawn to it for the reason I indicated above.

    They certainly don’t do it for the fabulous rewards, pay and career opportunities, which I think tends to support my theory. My guess is that if these things were to happen you would probably get a lot more dilettantes and opportunists into it for the PR, etc. which would probably degrade it to something like pro wrestling. I give them a lot of credit.
    Where they differ from men is that for the most part they don’t seem to react like men do; they don’t seem to wear “defeat” as a heavy failure the way men do, and can turn around and be convivial and friendly with their opponent in the next minute in the way men can’t, at least with any sincerity.

    The surprising thing is that unlike what someone might theorize or imagine, it is not really echoed in the rest of their lives, in terms of behavior, aggression, attitude, etc. Most are surprisingly attractive, and seem to be perfectly normal in every other respect.
    So I doubt there is a rational as to “why” they do it; they are just drawn to it.
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    Rox21
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed May 24, 2006 1:24 pm
    Pro Fighter

    Joined: Mon Apr 05, 2004 6:49 pm
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    Location: Kanagawa/Japan
    Because I looooove it!

    I dunno. I feel like I’m the last person in the world who would be doing this. But, when I was a kid, I was always jumping all over my father, trying to wrestle, him, climb up his legs and back and we “faught” every saturday. This was like since I was 6.

    It started with TKD and continued to Judo…it just makes my heart happy. When I hit people, I don’t even think about hitting them, really..it’s just a sport now. Hitting someone becomes physical pain, and there’s things so much worse in the world than being punched in the face…
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    AnnaTrocity
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed May 24, 2006 2:05 pm
    less internet
    Last edited by AnnaTrocity on Sun Sep 12, 2010 11:29 am, edited 1 time in total.

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    Mook
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed May 24, 2006 2:47 pm

    Joined: Thu Apr 29, 2004 9:09 am
    Posts: 37
    Well Rox you kind of fit what I said above- you’re a “natural,” which I would say characterizes most here.

    I’m curious though. There is very little history here. What would you have done if it was not much more than a decade ago? Do you think this would have come up if there was no female fighting around, or would it be expressed in other ways or sublmated?

    Annatrocity is something else- making a deliberative, conscientious decision to do this, sort of the way a woman might decide to skydive or something.
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    fight4you
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed May 24, 2006 2:53 pm

    Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:03 pm
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    so i am puzzled, rox says she loves to hit someone and the pain and possible injury involved is not a turnoff. i suppose being hit and the pain and possible injury she can receive is not a turn off either. In fact, the violence and pain and injury are not accidents as they are in other sports.

    So – how did you, why did you, overcome all that you were taught to be as woman, so that you could enjoy something that is so 180 degrees opposite?

    Guys are usually brain-dead from testosterone poisoning and have long-ago lost any good sense. How else could one explain “Jackass” and the existence of ball-busting websites?

    I’m trying to figure out how female fighters took this path and why.
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    Rikki
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed May 24, 2006 5:53 pm
    Instructor

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    Location: Lexington, KY
    Why do guys play high school football with no intention of “going pro”? Because it’s fun. I do this because it’s fun. I do this because I like the way it feels when I hit someone. I like how it feels when I get hit; it reminds me that I’m alive the way very few other things do. I do it for the same reasons I ride roller coasters….for the thrill.

    But I think it was best said on this forum before (who said it escapes me at the moment) –

    I am a fighter chick.
    I do not fight because I am tough.
    Tough has many more meanings than the sheer ability to give or take a punch.
    I do not fight to scare you.
    If I do scare you, there are insecurities within yourself.
    I do not fight because I like pain.
    Pain is accepted if it is constructive…
    …pain without a purpose is pointless.
    I do not fight to prove that women are just like men.
    We’re not. We’re different.
    And our strengths are in different areas.
    We are men’s compliment, not their competition.
    I do not fight because I’m angry.
    Anger is a lack of control, and a tool your opponent can use against you.
    I do not fight to stay in shape.
    I don’t care what my size or shape is…
    …as long as it gives me an advantage over my opponent.
    I do not fight because I am violent.
    Violence is a part of life.
    I embrace it within the confines of the ring.
    Outside the ring, I refuse to be its victim…
    …just as I refuse to have the rest of my life ruled by it.
    So…why do I fight?
    I fight because it’s fun!
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    fight4you
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed May 24, 2006 6:39 pm

    Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:03 pm
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    well guys play football because of a pretty STRONG societal influence and reward for them to do so. it seems to be one of the american male archetypes along with a fast car, a can of beer and , in some areas, a gun.

    getting in a cage or a ring to get pounded or kneed in the head is not really a traditional female path. so you gave us the “what”, which is… it is fun for you to hit and be hit. the question is ‘why’? why is that fun – fun enough to surmount so many obstacles to attain it?
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    Rikki
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed May 24, 2006 7:40 pm
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    Quote:
    well guys play football because of a pretty STRONG societal influence and reward for them to do so. it seems to be one of the american male archetypes along with a fast car, a can of beer and , in some areas, a gun.

    They could choose to play basketball or baseball instead, though. They choose football because that is what is most fun for them.

    Quote:
    getting in a cage or a ring to get pounded or kneed in the head is not really a traditional female path. so you gave us the “what”, which is… it is fun for you to hit and be hit. the question is ‘why’? why is that fun – fun enough to surmount so many obstacles to attain it?

    Why is anything fun? It’s fun because you like it. People like things without making a conscious decision to like them. It just turns out that way.
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    ktnzgtklws
    Post subject: PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2006 6:35 pm

    Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2006 8:48 pm
    Posts: 47
    Location: Tucson, AZ
    I believe my prior post as to why I’m a fighter chick was posted above. However, you seem to be wanting more elaboration, so let’s see if I can expound upon my reasoning.
    I fight because almost solely because it’s fun. Why? I don’t know why. Why am I bored by basketball, or soccer, yet love running? Why do I like purple, yet don’t care for brown? They’re preferences that are simply wired in my head. *shrug* Two things I CAN think of; one is the fact that I’ve always been physical, this is simply a natural extension of that. The other is that I have always been more interested in solo sports with a looser knit team orientation, than actual team sports. Track verses soccer, if you will.
    I also know that I like the practical nature of fighting. I can study my martial art all day and all week, doing forms and kata, yet what does that get me if I ever AM in a situation where I have to use it? I think that if there were no women’s MMA, women would simply do what everyone did prior to it’s commercialized conception; spar, be that contest style point sparring, or more contact orientated sparring one finds in most dojos.
    I also do it *because* I have a hesitancy of harming someone. A natural trepidation, if you will. If I am to be able to protect myself or my loved ones, then this must be overcome. I refuse to become a victim, I refuse to live behind locked doors and closed windows in fear, plain and simple. I’m simply the type of person who, when confronted with something that makes me nervous, will sit still, examine, and then test it out, before I throw in the towel and simply say “it scares me.” Does this lead to some rather rash decision making? Sometimes, yes. But so far I’ve proven time and time again to myself that most fears and societal constraints are silly things that should be challenged, and that I’m one of the (seemingly few) people that has the strength to do this without getting emotionaly or mentally damaged by it. (I would say physically, but we ARE talking mostly about fighting here!)
    In the end, for me, it would have to be the feeling of accomplishment, the feeling of security in my knowledge of my art, and the trust in my own strength and abilities go far and above whatever monetary gain or possible fame.
    I think that you’ll find that the reason varries for every dingle person; there is no set answer. People like different things because it evokes different feelings in them. Why do men prefer baseball? Why not basketball, soccer, football, car racing? People don’t ONLY do things because society tells them it’s good or proper, or for some, because it’s not good and improper.
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    goodgirl
    Post subject: PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2006 8:49 pm

    Joined: Mon Apr 17, 2006 10:47 pm
    Posts: 5
    As a girl you are forced to ask yourself the same question, simply because many people ask 🙂 I tried to think about it as well, why do I like a fighting sport and why would I like to fight?

    Firstly I have been brought up being able to decide for myself what I like to do, wear, play, I was not told “you are a girl, you can not do X”, I was told I can do everything I want. I was a bit of a tomboy, I never felt restricted.

    Secondly my parents were divorced early (age 5) and my father died (age 13), maybe I had more of a feeling to be responsible for myself. I am an only child as well.

    I never had a boyfriend and I generally am responsible completely for myself with everything I do.

    I want to feel stong or stronger, because I know I am alone and I have to be strong. That’s why I like to learn how to fight.

    The discipline to take care of my own health without antone telling me to eat well and take good care is also challenging.

    The reason for wanting to actually fight, not only train is very clear to me, mainly to see how good I really am and to remind myself that I might not be as good as I think and to know what I have to work on to get better.
    Of course making people (like trainers) proud of me and showing off to some degree would also be extra reasons for fighting as well as the excitement.

    Generelly I would get bored without a challenge to learn something new, Fighting is pretty complex, other sports are not as complex and you can’t get better anymore, with fighting I feel I can always get better.
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    anna
    Post subject: PostPosted: Fri May 26, 2006 2:52 am

    Joined: Fri Feb 18, 2005 6:16 am
    Posts: 16
    Well the initial question was a pretty good one, albeit hardly original, but you followed it up with some pretty lame points. Which I will answer 😈

    “It is a pursuit that takes a lot of time, effort and discomfort”

    Nothing worth having is easily attained.

    “The return is NOT big bucks and fame.”

    So?

    1.) “Most girls don’t like violence”.

    I still don’t like violence.

    2.) “It is not feminine and ladylike behavior.”

    I am not particularly either of the above any way.

    3.) “What’s a girl doing a guy thing for?”

    I don’t believe fighting is a guy thing. Humans have always fought each other. Also women only usually fight women. That is certainly not a “guy thing”.

    4.) “Why risk your looks? “etc.

    Hahaha. A bit of colly ear never hurt any one 😛

    “I ask because there are many many choices that offer a longer competition window and much more reward. Look at the professional lifespan and paychecks for those women in golf, tennis, billiards, even volleyball. ”

    You forgot knitting. I am awful at all of the above sports, hence I don’t play them.

    You make it sound like every woman in MMA is choosing a harder life over an easier one. Perhaps there is no choice?
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    fight4you
    Post subject: PostPosted: Fri May 26, 2006 9:12 am

    Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:03 pm
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    Well thanks for your thoughts, though I don’t think anything I have asked or placed as a conversational ‘jumping off point’ was lame. The questions I offered to start the thought process, certainly are not things you have not heard before. Regarding choice..unless you are in prison, I think there is always a choice. I am learning why you all do choose a more dangerous, less professionally/financially rewarding path. I do find it interesting that you do consider MMA/NHB cage fighting to NOT be violent though. I will have to spend some time to wrap my head around that one.
    Last edited by fight4you on Fri May 26, 2006 5:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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    anna
    Post subject: PostPosted: Fri May 26, 2006 11:16 am

    Joined: Fri Feb 18, 2005 6:16 am
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    🙂
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    goodgirl
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sat May 27, 2006 4:21 pm

    Joined: Mon Apr 17, 2006 10:47 pm
    Posts: 5
    fight4you wrote:
    I am learning why you all do choose a more dangerous, less professionally/financially rewarding path.
    I don’t consider it as a ‘path’, it’s just one of many many things I am learning and doing in my life, but not a career choice. I have my own business, I don’t do it for money, just for fun.
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    ktnzgtklws
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sat May 27, 2006 5:07 pm

    Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2006 8:48 pm
    Posts: 47
    Location: Tucson, AZ
    [quote=”fight4you”]Well thanks for your thoughts, though I don’t think anything I have asked or placed as a conversational ‘jumping off point’ was lame. The questions I offered to start the thought process, certainly are not things you have not heard before. Regarding choice..unless you are in prison, I think there is always a choice. I am learning why you all do choose a more dangerous, less professionally/financially rewarding path. I do find it interesting that you do consider MMA/NHB cage fighting to NOT be violent though. I will have to spend some time to wrap my head around that one.[/quote]

    I do not consider it violent, because for me the term “violence” brings to mind things done with a malicious intent. When I get in a ring, I am planning on being aggressive, assertive, dominant, and, hopefully, skilled. I am there to learn, to have fun, to test my skills and see where I am in need of improvement. I want to leave the ring with, ideally, the same IQ I arrived with, with all my bits and pieces in the places they were when I arrived, and in proper working order. I also have the same desire for my opponent. I obey the rules, I stop if someone taps, I thank them at the end. My intent is not, directly, to actually cause them any lasting harm. So to me, while being a physical sport, and while it could certainly be seen by some as violent, it only wears the costume of violence. To me, it lacks the main parameter with which to gauge violence; the willingness, intent, desire, and dare I say, pleasure from, causing another long term harm.
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    StylistAjax
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sat May 27, 2006 10:10 pm

    Joined: Thu Mar 30, 2006 10:12 pm
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    I like looking smile and showing off my cleavage and nice legs while pounding another girl in the face.
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    fight4you
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sun May 28, 2006 4:38 am

    Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:03 pm
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    well “ktnzgtklws”, i suppose I am flattered that have taken this thread to your own on-line journal. I do find your comment “costume of violence” to be interesting. The whole MMA/NHB world has played around with that abit. The original UFC reveived a heaping pile of crap because it resembled “Blood Sport” and “Backyard Wrestling” more than it did a reputable sport. Back in the day, it revelled in in rediculous match-ups ( a 600 lb sumo wrestler against a 250 lb strker?), ballshots, elbows to the brainstems, many seriously dangerous moves.

    Certainly it is ‘cleaned up’ now, though many fans prefer the older style (Don’t get me started on the UFCs past love affair with Tank Abbot) . I am sure the promoters’ accountants and legal staff do not, though.

    Continuing on with the ‘costume of violence’, even the term “No Holds Barred” bring forth inaccurate and grisly images. The UFC cage is a throwback to smile. Even the image of sitting on a downed opponent while raining blows is more of an image of a schoolyard bully beating than a fair competition ( and not the best situation to find yourself in on the street, I would think)

    So MMA does play with, market violence and injury as much as it does being a reputable sporting event.

    I have just been curious as to what appeals to women about that and why, as so many have left their answers with, do women find it ‘fun’.
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    fight4you
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sun May 28, 2006 4:39 am

    Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:03 pm
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    stylistajax – not to be insulting or provocative but – are you female? are you real? Your post is a bit of a head spinner.
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    ktnzgtklws
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sun May 28, 2006 12:01 pm

    Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2006 8:48 pm
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    Location: Tucson, AZ
    Fight4U,

    You seem to continuously harp on how the old school days of UFC were so much more brutal, people want them back, etc. I certainly have not heard of anyone talking “about the good ‘ol days” of UFC fighting. I don’t know the crowd you hang out with, but in my neck of the woods, I have not noticed that as being the case. Do people want to see realistic fighting? Sure. Do people want fighters matched? Yes. Why? Because it’s BORING watching one person pummel another. I want to see the skills the two people have, and all the fights I have watched that are entertaining and educational are when it’s two fighters who are similar in size and skill.
    Is it possible that these random pairings and dangerous shots were allowed as marketing gimicks, a la WWF? How much of this was actually demanded by the audience, and how much of it was put out there for publicity? There really is something to “no such thing as bad publicity.” Who knows?
    In general, it seems that you are fixated on this concept of violence, and how if pertains to women and thier fighting. Women are not men. Our reasons will probably not be the same as men. It seems to me that several people have tried to convey to you what is to for them to fight, and it’s just not sticking. I’m sorry that my frail attempts can not help you understand, but I do hope that you find what you’re looking for.
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    fight4you
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sun May 28, 2006 3:56 pm

    Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:03 pm
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    gee, i didn’t see your exposed nerve-end laying out there
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    ktnzgtklws
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sun May 28, 2006 7:34 pm

    Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2006 8:48 pm
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    Location: Tucson, AZ
    [quote=”StylistAjax”]I like looking smile and showing off my cleavage and nice legs while pounding another girl in the face.[/quote]

    *snicker, snort, ROTFL*

    Ah, nice to see someone with a sense of humour…
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    fight4you
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sun May 28, 2006 10:10 pm

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    hmmmmm
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    treelizard
    Post subject: PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2006 2:13 pm
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    Wow, nobody’s touched on my primary motivation for training as a woman, which is to even the playing field a little bit. The same is true for, say, paintball. It is the great equalizer. Learning how to use positioning to control an opponent, even if it is a big muscle guy, learning how to use skill and strategy, how to take a hit and keep on fighting… all of these are skills that are extremely empowering and a heck of a lot of fun. Though they could be used for self-protection. I DO think it’s VERY “feminine” and “ladylike” to learn how to get home safely, since other people depend on me. I don’t like violence either, which is why I train so I can protect myself from it. Why risk your looks? What kind of question is that? Like the bad guy on the street is going to protect your looks! Why risk your life (by not training) is perhaps a better question. Not all of us have male escorts 24/7.

    Some questions for the question-asker. Why are you concerned with why women train? Do you have specific motivations for wanting to be in a world where women DON’T train? Do you feel less masculine if you are with a woman who doesn’t need you to protect her because she can protect herself? Why do you feel that your issues watching women fight are reflective of them instead of you?
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    fight4you
    Post subject: PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2006 2:24 pm

    Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:03 pm
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    LOL, provocative aren’t you? to answer you –
    >I am not concerned, I was curious.
    >Nope, I would rather live in a world where no one needed violence to either live or be entertained but…..
    >Nope, I am more attracted to independent, confident, physical, assertive women than those who are not.
    >Well you assume that I watch women fight and that it is a result of my issues. I was asking what issues made them want to fight – for fun and profit, which is different than learning how to defend oneself.

    Sorry to not fit in your presumptuous boxes/
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    debi
    Post subject: PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2006 2:43 pm
    Fightergirls Pro Fight Team

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    well to get rich of course 🙄
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    fight4you
    Post subject: PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2006 4:03 pm

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    yes, ground and pounders are on the fast track to great riches. maybe the event promoters are. u know, the ones in the safe seats.
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    Sanuk Sabai
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed Jun 14, 2006 1:14 pm

    Joined: Sat Mar 18, 2006 3:40 pm
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    Location: Black Mountain NC
    I’ve found this tread to be rather thought provoking and deserving of at least an attempt at an explanation.
    Speaking only for myself, what attracted me to combat sports was the immense of defeat. Scared me to death. Initially inspired by Yukio Mishima’s “Sun and Steel” and the tradition of the warrior poets of Japan I set about to conquer a fear and develop the skills required for both actual and sport combat. It’s one of the most difficult things in the world to do.
    In being so difficult, I’m not at all surprised that certain types of people are attracted to these activities. If you’re a lousy golfer, so what? If you’re a bad boxer then you’re in for a really bad time. While I’m not a woman I see plenty of examples of women with the unique combination of physical and mental elements required for success in every imaginable field of endeavor. Why not MMA? The rewards, however, are more internalized and less obvious to your general non-participants.
    Also, with the evolution, and I do mean evolution of MMA, martial artists are presented with an ever expanding pallet of expression. Sounds bizarre to our contrarian friend I’m sure but for those who have not only followed the major “commercial events” over the years but have studied and trained have seen the emergence of a literally new martial technology.
    Regardless of whatever pop culture posturing may be used to sell commercial MMA events, I’ve found this sport awash in humility and generosity compared to many mainstream sport. I believe this to be, once again, due to the ever present possibility of defeat. In how many other sport other than combat sports do the victorious and vanquished hug….?
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    fight4you
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed Jun 14, 2006 3:10 pm

    Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:03 pm
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    contrarian eh?

    so if as humble and spiritually enlightening and event as you say – why all the human smile, “only one walks out”, pitfight marketing ploys?

    what is with the ex-con type of look that many male fighters embrace?

    there seems to be many, many examples of behavior after a win that is nowhere close to being ‘humble and spritually evolved”, don’t you think?

    and the fight crowd – ah, the fight crowd at a UFC. that could be a treatise in and of itself, no?

    contrarian? maybe independent?
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    Sanuk Sabai
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed Jun 14, 2006 4:26 pm

    Joined: Sat Mar 18, 2006 3:40 pm
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    Location: Black Mountain NC
    1. Yes, contrarian. Perhaps not in the general population but on at least on this forum, I do believe you to be in the minority. In the forum of ideas it’s not a bad position.

    2. TV, like public education and running for public office, is geared to the lowest common denominator. Doesn’t just the word smile illicit tingles? Unfortunately being oddly wired the only thing the word smile brings to mind is the image of John McCain dropping actual bombs on people.

    3. Everyone knows that Jui-jitsu is only homoerotic when accompanied by a long, steady and intense gaze into each other’s eyes.

    4. Yes. But you wanna know who’s obnoxious and unsportsmen like? Those professional poker pricks!

    5. I’m as bereft for an explanation of a U.F.C crowd as I am for that of an “American Idol” audience.
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    Nightmareslumber
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed Jun 14, 2006 6:05 pm

    Joined: Fri Jun 09, 2006 9:48 pm
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    Fight4Life, maybe people could better understand where you come from if you explain your beliefs and reasons for your training if any and in what style(s) and why you picked that style. If you aren’t a fan of female fighters than you are on the wrong forum. If you Fight4life is just verbal fights then I do understand why you picked this one. Do you train and if so in what arts and what do you get out of training or hope to get out of it. Everyone is entitled to their opinion but if not a fan (and maybe you are) of female fighters, than why post here. Honestly I am new here and haven’t read any of your other posts but the ones within the past week or so.
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    buckshot1984
    Post subject: PostPosted: Fri Jun 16, 2006 1:43 pm

    Joined: Fri Jun 16, 2006 4:57 am
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    Location: Gastonia, NC
    I guess its the same reason that girls play softball or basketball. Its because we have that passion for martial arts, be it mma, Jiu jitsu, grappling, Kickboxing etc… It is kind of like faith… its just there.
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    Meeshell
    Post subject: PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2006 7:11 pm

    Joined: Mon May 22, 2006 6:47 am
    Posts: 4
    Location: Albuquerque, NM
    I’ve never really been overly physically active. I’ve been involved in a few various martial arts, competed in TKD tournaments and liked it but never loved it. It was something to do. I’d quit before I got far with training, never really getting beyond a yellow or orange belt, and that was so long ago now. But with this new year I made a resolution for myself to find something that I loved to do so that I could get away from sitting in front of the computer, playing video games, and my widening behind. So I started boxing and kickboxing and quickly found that I enjoyed it. Shortly after that I decided to give the new No Gi Grappling classes my gym started offering a try. I found that I enjoy it even more than kickboxing. I go to kickboxing/boxing classes everyday just so I can treat myself to the grappling afterwards. It’s a treat! I love it, my day isn’t complete wth out it. I’ve come to see that if I could do nothing else but train, I would. Unfortunately real life sets in and I do have to pay for my classes somehow, so I get to work and not train 8 hours a day. 🙂

    The funny thing is that I haven’t lost a ton of weight by working out. Maybe 8 pounds now, in about three full months of Monday through Friday training, 2 hours a day. I have however lost 5.8% bodyfat, which is good. But, more importantly, I have come to be comfortable in my own skin and I don’t worry so much about my weight anymore. The grappling gets me out, in shorts, which I used to hate wearing, in other people’s personal space, something I’ve feared for a long time, and enjoying every minute of it!

    So, that’s why I fight.
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    Roebozz
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sat Jun 24, 2006 9:32 am

    Joined: Wed May 17, 2006 7:32 am
    Posts: 43
    Location: long island, NY
    Nice Nightmareslumber

    I train for endurance, strength, my personal protection and i love the way i look and feel
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    fight4you
    Post subject: PostPosted: Sat Jun 24, 2006 4:37 pm

    Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:03 pm
    Posts: 429
    so, if you were attacked in the real world, do you think being on your back in the alley or being on top, throwing a ground and pound ( two mma/nhb staples) are great examples of personal protection?
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    Roebozz
    Post subject: PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 6:36 am

    Joined: Wed May 17, 2006 7:32 am
    Posts: 43
    Location: long island, NY
    Posted: Sun Jun 25, 2006 12:37 am Post subject:

    ——————————————————————————–

    so, if you were attacked in the real world, do you think being on your back in the alley or being on top, throwing a ground and pound ( two mma/nhb staples) are great examples of personal protection
    It depends on what i’m up against but overall I feel i have better control of my opponent from the bottom-
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    greatlaughter
    Post subject: PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 7:17 am
    Pro Fighter

    Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2004 4:15 pm
    Posts: 259
    Location: Petaluma, CA
    fight4you, i think that there is much more than surface moves you see in mma that contribute to self defense. for example, someone can choke me to death with a maniac choke if i panic. knowing that it is the simplest thing to defend or get out of, i know that i am not truly in danger, break the hold and continue fighting. i think that in a dark alley attack or a spousal attack or date rape, the most important things are: keeping your head straight, sweeps and reversals (then run), and either a rear naked or trianlge choke (’til sleeping or death) if running isn’t an option. there’s also striking to the throat, eyes & groin.

    in an attack, i wouln’t mount and punch my opponent as there are far superior ways to discourage your attacker from continuing. if it is life vs death or rape i hope i’d use the nastiest stuff i’ve learned to terminate the attacker. it’s too bad more women don’t make the time to learn some basics that can be the difference between life and death.

    had i never trained mma, i wouldn’t know that a hard punch to the throat can kill someone, or how to get a big man off the top of you, or that i could break limbs from my back. it gives me security in knowing that i am a lethal opponant to an unarmed attacker. i hope to expand my training soon to include weapons defense. until then I guess you just run and hope they miss. 🙄
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    fight4you
    Post subject: PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 10:14 am

    Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:03 pm
    Posts: 429
    well ithink mma/nhb, as it is presently marketed, is much more of an entertainment event than a viable real-world, self-defense form.
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    Rikki
    Post subject: PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 11:18 am
    Instructor

    Joined: Mon Aug 09, 2004 6:56 am
    Posts: 915
    Location: Lexington, KY
    fight4you wrote:
    well ithink mma/nhb, as it is presently marketed, is much more of an entertainment event than a viable real-world, self-defense form.
    Fighting events are for entertainment, MMA training is most certainly good for self defense.
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    fight4you
    Post subject: PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 3:40 pm

    Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:03 pm
    Posts: 429
    thank you, rikki. the mma fighting events just give the fans more buzz than boxing and more reality than wwe. I propose that hitting a man (woman) when they are down or defenseless is neither sport nor particularly moral. but, for some, quite entertaining to watch.
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    AnnaTrocity
    Post subject: PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 4:17 pm
    less internet
    Last edited by AnnaTrocity on Sun Sep 12, 2010 11:27 am, edited 1 time in total.

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    themannon
    Post subject: PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 4:33 pm

    Joined: Fri May 06, 2005 2:39 pm
    Posts: 29
    My own personal experience is that I’ve seen people (men and women) who are pretty skilled in one martial art or the other take real ass whuppins in a street fight.

    1. Street fights don’t follow any rules. Some people who have never been in a real fight outside of the gym have NO idea how to fight outside of their comfort zone. In my experience, this is more of a problem for females. I’ve seen a couple of very skilled women freakout when their opponent started pulling hair and scratching her face up.

    2. Guys (and its always been guys for this one) think their skills can overcome massize size and strength differences. Skill can definitely overcome size, but a 240 lb badass is a 240 lb badass. When he hits you, you’re in trouble, BJJ skills or no.

    Understand, I come from a really rough area where people grow up fighting. Of course, winning a street fight and self-defense aren’t the same thing.
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    AnnaTrocity
    Post subject: PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 5:42 pm
    less internet
    Last edited by AnnaTrocity on Sun Sep 12, 2010 11:26 am, edited 1 time in total.

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    Rikki
    Post subject: PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 5:55 pm
    Instructor

    Joined: Mon Aug 09, 2004 6:56 am
    Posts: 915
    Location: Lexington, KY
    AnnaTrocity wrote:
    What people need to keep in mind is that most so called martial arts are a pathetic mockery of what they claim to be.

    To compare a competitive athlete that fights for real or at least trains to do so to most martial artists is hardly fair.
    Amen!
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    BrawlerBitch
    Post subject: PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 6:18 pm

    Joined: Sun Jun 25, 2006 5:32 am
    Posts: 103
    fight4you wrote:
    I propose that hitting a man (woman) when they are down or defenseless is neither sport nor particularly moral
    I disagre with your proposal that hitting someone when they are down or defensless is not a sport or moral.

    Killing the enemy is not immoral, it is war.
    Hitting someone when they are down is a way to make sure your enemy does not get back up and kill you.

    Sport is battle without a war. It is man’s way of satisfying our deep set desire to conquor. historically when there is no war, we create one with sports.

    MMA gets to the most bare essence of hand to hand combat. Overcome the enemy with no weapons but your body against their body. Minimal rules to satisfy our inherant legacy of violence, but with a very level playing field, no clubs, knives or swords.

    I do not believe this ingrained primordial desire for combat is immoral because it came to us over the 100,000’s of thousands of years that man has been evolving and walking this earth. It is who we are.

    As far as my reasonse for wanting to fight……….I have a a true love for the fundemental simplicity of one body against another body, where skill, heart & brute strength is the core of the sport.

    Also I have a big ego.
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    fight4you

    Post subject: PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 10:30 pm

    Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:03 pm
    Posts: 429
    I disagre with your proposal that hitting someone when they are down or defensless is not a sport or moral.

    Killing the enemy is not immoral, it is war. <<<THERE IS MORALITY IN WAR IF YOU ARE A MORAL PERSON. HENCE THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE ISLAMO-FASCISTS AND OUR MARINES.

    Hitting someone when they are down is a way to make sure your enemy does not get back up and kill you. THEN ENTER SPECIAL OPS RATHER THAN THE UFC.

    Sport is battle without a war. It is man’s way of satisfying our deep set desire to conquor. historically when there is no war, we create one with sports.

    MMA gets to the most bare essence of hand to hand combat. Overcome the enemy with no weapons but your body against their body. Minimal rules to satisfy our inherant legacy of violence, but with a very level playing field, no clubs, knives or swords. SO U FIND PLEASURE AND ENJOYMENT FROM WATCHING VIOLENCE AND INTENTIONAL INJURY TO OTHERS. THAT’S A WHOLE DIFFERENT CONVERSATION

    I do not believe this ingrained primordial desire for combat is immoral because it came to us over the 100,000’s of thousands of years that man has been evolving and walking this earth. It is who we are. WELL RAPE AND CHILD smile ABUSE HAS BEEN AROUND AS LONG SO THAT IS NOT THE BEST ARGUMENT,MAYBE.

    As far as my reasonse for wanting to fight……….I have a a true love for the fundemental simplicity of one body against another body, where skill, heart & brute strength is the core of the sport. SO YOU LIKE TO RISK AND ENDURE PAIN AND INJURY IN THE PURSUIT OF INTENTIONALLY INFLICTING IT?

    Also I have a big ego. YES, I MIGHT AGREE BUT MANY OF US DO.
    Last edited by fight4you on Wed Jun 28, 2006 5:38 am, edited 1 time in total.

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    BrawlerBitch
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 5:29 am

    Joined: Sun Jun 25, 2006 5:32 am
    Posts: 103
    fight4you wrote:
    SO YOU LIKE TO RISK AND ENDURE PAIN AND INJURY (AND POSSIBLE DEATH) IN THE PURSUIT OF INTENTIONALLY INFLICTING IT?
    Most everything I have done in my life (I’m 46) has put me in harms way & I love the challange. I like overcoming physical pain. I have risked death many times over and I have some old injuries to prove it. I just recovered from 5 broken ribs, a torn muscle in my pelvis, 2 broken hands & my 5th concussion in my life, after my horse & I went off a cliff chasing cattle in Wyoming.

    As far as inflicting physical pain on others………only on willing partners. 😉

    BTW, you spend most of your time here verbally sparing & trying to hurt people emotionally, so you have your own way of trying to inflict pain on others. You just come here to fight.
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    fight4you
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 5:42 am

    Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:03 pm
    Posts: 429
    You said,”BTW, you spend most of your time here verbally sparing & trying to hurt people emotionally, so you have your own way of trying to inflict pain on others. You just come here to fight.”

    Nope, it’s called a conversation and sometimes a debate. If my typed words can hurt others and cause them pain, then them stepping into a cage to fight might not be the best choice for them. I doubt the ‘ground and pound’ is the best experience for the inordinately sensitive. But I might be wrong.
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    BrawlerBitch
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 7:32 am

    Joined: Sun Jun 25, 2006 5:32 am
    Posts: 103
    LOL! I didn’t say you inflict pain, only that you try to. Your verbal sparing will not keep a woman from fighting, no matter how much you wish it would. Face it buddy…….you are powerless over women & I know that drives you bonkers. You are not a fight fan. I don’t know why you post here other than to be direspectful to women & to all fighters.
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    fight4you
    Post subject: PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 9:51 am

    Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:03 pm
    Posts: 429
    your presume too much and are not very accurate but that is ok
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    Seth
    Post subject: PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2006 11:08 am

    Joined: Mon Sep 27, 2004 3:15 pm
    Posts: 67
    Quote:
    If my typed words can hurt others and cause them pain, then stepping into a cage to fight might not be the best choice for them. I doubt the ‘ground and pound’ is the best experience for the inordinately sensitive.
    It might not be a progression in morass to go from a verbal/typed word fight to a cage match. As incongruous as it seems, some would rather deal with a hard G’P delivered in good conscience than get into a petty argument that descends into emotional vileness… just a general statement not an implication.

    I wonder what edge a fighter might have in MMA/NHB that participated in “street” fights during youth in terms of aggression, recovering from a beatdown and finishing the fight.

    The quote function button is a little funky at the post display.
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    Nightmareslumber
    Post subject: PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2006 4:08 pm

    Joined: Fri Jun 09, 2006 9:48 pm
    Posts: 8
    alot of people don’t know it but while the Russians were creating Sambo and applying to warfare, the reasoned to use leg locks and ankle locks to remove up to three people from battle. if you kill the enemy, the body is left till later, if you break and arm or disable an arm they can run off the battle field, a broke leg/ankle bone or joint required another soldier to help the commrade off the battlefield and maybe two to help in order to do it quickly. MMA rules stop the fight when an opponet is Defenless and not fighting back. MMA shows you many good things about fighting from the ground so you are not defenseless just because you are down. What again is it you train in and why? I missed it earlier if you posted fight4life. Since BJJ is not a good self defense then please tell me what it is you would do when mounted by an attacker. Most street fights do end up that way because people untrained in a form of true self defense are helpless there.
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    voly
    Post subject: PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2006 4:09 pm

    Joined: Sun Sep 05, 2004 12:35 pm
    Posts: 85
    For a period of time I tried to like mma contests, but couldn’t do it. I found I was always a little uncomfortable while watching – decidedly uncomfortable on occasion. However, I can understand that others (audiences, even the fighters) could find the activity worthwhile. I also dislike ping pong, weightlifting, and figure skating. I have little or no trouble avoiding those activities and am unconcerned that they attract plenty of fans and enthusiastic participants.

    No doubt mma training, or a working knowledge of any of the combat discipines, would be of at least a little value in a physical altercation, just possibly more than a little. The amount of importance assigned to that consideration, though, is going to vary from one individual to another. If I preferred playing volleyball to learning jiu jitsu I would pursue volleyball – even if I was planning to attend a few English soccer games.
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    fight4you
    Post subject: PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2006 4:46 pm

    Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:03 pm
    Posts: 429
    but mma/nhb events like ufc, k-1, pride are not offered/structured as self-defense demos – they are designed entertainment
    Last edited by fight4you on Fri Jun 30, 2006 3:51 am, edited 1 time in total.

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    AnnaTrocity
    Post subject: PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2006 7:26 pm
    less internet
    Last edited by AnnaTrocity on Sun Sep 12, 2010 11:25 am, edited 1 time in total.

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    fight4you
    Post subject: PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 2006 3:52 am

    Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:03 pm
    Posts: 429
    ahhh now anna hits the nail on the head
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    Meeshell
    Post subject: PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2006 6:28 am

    Joined: Mon May 22, 2006 6:47 am
    Posts: 4
    Location: Albuquerque, NM
    fight4you wrote:
    so, if you were attacked in the real world, do you think being on your back in the alley or being on top, throwing a ground and pound (two mma/nhb staples) are great examples of personal protection?

    Not me, but I expect what I have learned of leverage, chokes, reversals and punches from different angels will put me in a better place than I was without any training at all.

    In addition to that I am healthier, stronger, more agile and more confident from my training. So if I were attacked in the real world, yes, I do believe I would survive. I wouldn’t however try to mount a real world attacker and ground and pound them or pull them into my guard, to do so would be pure stupidity.
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    voly
    Post subject: PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2006 11:02 am

    Joined: Sun Sep 05, 2004 12:35 pm
    Posts: 85
    [quote] “punches from different angels”[quote]

    inspiring concept
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    neonataldragon
    Post subject: PostPosted: Thu Jul 06, 2006 10:50 am

    Joined: Thu Jun 29, 2006 7:25 pm
    Posts: 7
    Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    i agree with Meeshell…
    i think i could survive a back alley fight (although i’d never put myself in that situation in the first place) enough to get outta there…plus, beiing able to fight would really surprise the attacker and give me the upper hand for a short while…at least if he didn’t have a gun…lol…
    i started fighting for the workout and it’s developed into a love and respect for martial arts in general…planning on fighting in the future…but not professionally…
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