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Lisa Newton and Claire Brannan

Lisa Newton and Claire Brannan Lisa v Gemma Lisa was originally supposed to fight MMA but her opponent dropped out with an injury and Lisa accepted a kickboxing fight. Then the opponent for that pulled out on the morning of the show with a ‘I’m not coming’ phone call. Gemma was supposed to be boxing and had a similar situation with a very late pullout. So Lisa said fine I’ll fight boxing, for the first time, and took the fight.

Lisa Newton and Claire Brannan

The two ladies went toe to toe for the first minute but better cardio and footwork gave Lisa Newton the advantage and she began to pick Gemma off, driving her into the cage and forcing her to cover up in the first round. The second round was more of the same, Lisa opened up and Gemma received 2 warnings for dropping her head low. Lisa then came flying back in and Gemma had no option but to cover up as Lisa through straight and hook combinations to force the ref to step in and end the fight.

Lisa Newton and Claire Brannan
Lisa Newton and Claire Brannan

Claire v Steve So we held a male v female fight. People on the boards in the UK were giving it the old males have better cardio and more power etc speak but Claire soon proved the old adage wrong. She had a solid first round catching Steve with her powerful right hooks and took the first round. The second was a lot closer as Steve upped his work rate and caught Claire with a couple of uppercuts and a round house kick to the head. Into the final round it was looking equal.

Both fighters looked tired but it came down to the sheer number of punches that Claire Brannan was connecting with. Claire threw everything at Steve and did enough to take the fight on a judges decision.

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Grappling Pictures 5

Fighter girlsEvent: Lekka Viera Vs Nori Avellen (Grappling Games Final)

Cindy Magdelena vs Rebecca Faber,Here are some lost pics from fightergirls. we thought you would like. Event took place on 2-4-04, Nori Avelen won the tournement, competitors were Lekka V. Nori. A Cindy M and Rebecca F.

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Grappling Games Pictures

Fighter girlsEvent: Cindy Vs Rebecca ( Grappling Games )

Cindy Magdelena vs Rebecca Faber, Here are some lost pics from fightergirls we thought you would like. Event took place on 2-4-04, Nori Avelen won the tournement, competitors were Lekka V. Nori. A Cindy M and Rebecca F.

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Results for Hook-N-Shoot Evolution

Hook-N-Shoot Evolution Megumi Fujii defeats Erica Montoya by unanimous decision.
Roxanne Modafferi defeats Jennifer Howe by unanimous decision.

Results for Hook-N-Shoot EvolutionJen Case defeats Julie Kedzie by armbar, RD 1.

Kelly Kobald defeats Greta Hicks by unanimous decision.

Tara Larosa defeats Linda Langerak by armbar, RD 2.

Adrienna Jenkins defeats Shelby Walker by rear naked choke, RD 1.

Ginelle Marquez defeats Molly Hessel by armbar, RD 2.

Jan Finney defeats Rikki Burnett by unanimous decision.

Mandy Stewart defeats Lisa Ward by triangle choke, RD 1.

Heath Pedigo defeats Eric Acker by triangle choke

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My Injury Women’s MMA

My Injury Women's MMA
My Injury Women’s MMA

My Injury Women’s MMA I wake up one Sunday morning, like any other Sunday morning, stretch and head to the kitchen to grind my coffee that I cannot live without. Hmmmm, that’s weird – my left arm feels numb and tingly from the shoulder to my fingertips. I surmise I must have slept on it funny. I move it around working the range of motion, opening and closing my fist, and decide to move along through my day. I need that cup of coffee. Run a few errands, clean a little, and then, it is dinner at a friend’s house. I clear the dishes and clean the kitchen for being fed so well. It is approximately 9 P.M. I decide I will take in a little of the massage chair, as by now my arm is aching moderately, mostly in the shoulder region. Hmmm, highest heat setting, most active mode, and deepest motion it will offer. Not too bad. I recline. I sit back up within a minute or two. Okay, that isn’t helping…I think it may have made it worse? I turn it off and sit and relax for a few minutes. It is not getting any better. My friend comes to check on me, and doesn’t like the look on my face apparently, “Do you need to go to the emergency room?” he offers. After I get over the fact that I can’t just grin and bear it anymore, I let him know I need to go to the emergency room. Off we go.

My Injury Women’s MMA

“What happened?” they ask. “Nothing”, I say, “I woke up this way.” Four hours, three x-rays, mountain of paperwork (what did you eat for breakfast 26 days ago?) in between tears of pain, and one Phenergan/Morphine shot that took them three hours to give me…and they tell me, “You need to see a neurosurgeon. Do not move your arm till you do.” Potential paralysis has not entered my mind at this point. Here is a sling and the prescription orders. Treat ‘em and Street ‘em. Okay, I’ve had better evenings.

On Monday, after I woke from my drug-induced sleep and have had my IV of…I mean cup of…coffee, I call my PCP (Primary Care Physician) for a referral to a neurosurgeon. He has to see you before he will refer. Of course he does! He wants his piece of the managed care pie! I work in the managed care health system, excuse the sarcasm. He needs to make sure the ER doctor knows his way around a stethoscope. First available is tomorrow. Okay. Tuesday morning at 6 A.M., I receive a call. My appointment has been cancelled due to bad weather that has come in (the sidewalks of Austin, Texas roll up for two days because we have not a single clue how to drive in a little ice and snow). I keep leaving messages trying to reschedule. I finally receive a return call on Friday and they can see me on Monday afternoon. I can hear my mother in my head, “Your eyes will get stuck like that!” as I roll my eyes at how helpful and understanding my doctor’s office is being. It’s a good thing my southern manners and the medication I was taking slowed my usual quick verbal wit.

On Monday, and after another mountain of paperwork, my PCP’s assistant decides I need to see a neurosurgeon. (Surprise!) Refer back to the third paragraph to see where a week of my life went. Hey, at this point, I’m doing the best I can to cope. The nurse gives me the referral and calls to get me in ASAP. First available is Friday morning. Obviously, my ASAP is different from their ASAP. Arrrgggghhhhh! I do not make a very good patient and I haven’t been training! Tracey is not a happy girl. Before Friday, I have to go by Austin Radiological Association and have a MRI done. I spend most of Wednesday doing that because they handle requests like this on a walk-in basis only. The MRI itself wasn’t too bad. However, my decision to be cremated is absolutely unquestionable now. There is no way my soul would be at peace in a coffin. Of course, as soon as I got home, I had the films out, holding them up to the dining room light, twisting and turning trying to understand them. I wasn’t quite prepared to see what I looked like without skin. Weird, but interesting.

My Injury Women’s MMA

Friday has come, I am in the waiting area alone trying to think positively and working on yet another mountain of paperwork. Would it kill these people to communicate with one another! Geez. I’m already driving a standard with one hand! Where’s Big Brother when you need them? Focus, focus, positive energy only! A little physical therapy and I’m good as new. Ways to train around this injury have been going through my head for days now. Guard work, I’ll work on my bottom game – my guard is horrible anyway and needs the work!

Dr. Hansen and I begin to talk. “Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, anything like the Japanese form?” he asks. Okay, that’s what I’m talking about! I’m immediately at ease, and have completely forgotten how irritated I was in the waiting room, as I spend several minutes explaining everything I know about the similarities and differences between the two forms. BJJ has become one of my favorite conversation pieces over the last year. Realizing we have gotten side tracked, he looks at my MRI’s. I can tell by his face I’m not going to like what he says. “What happened?” he asks. Again, I tell “the I woke up this way” story. He points to C2/C3 on my MRI showing normal disc separation, location of spinal fluid, and my spine. Cool. We then move to C4-C7. Not so cool. At C3/C4, about one-third of my spine is visible. At C4/C5, C5/C6, and C6/C7, it is not visible at all. Now, paralysis crosses my mind. “This has been degenerating for a while,” he states, “Has there been any jarring trauma, a fall, a car accident?” Light bulbs go off in my head and my memory was jogged: rear-ended, “whiplash”, over a year ago, my neck and shoulders have hurt ever since. Grappling or Yoga may have aggravated it or I could have just moved and hit the right place while I was sleeping. No way to really know the exact sequence of events that caused the actual herniation that hit several nerve roots in my cervical spine and rendered my left arm useless and painful. To make it worse, my right arm was already exhibiting the same symptoms of nerve damage. Bottom line. Surgery. Fusion. The next few minutes are a blur, Dr. Hansen is explaining the procedure and showing me the titanium plate and eight screws that will be surgically fused into my spine along with using bone chipped from my hip to replace the discs being removed. Do not go to this kind of appointment alone. Take someone that can think of all the questions you want to ask, when you suddenly are not able to think straight at all. I was doing relatively okay till I asked about resuming my normal physical activities. A lot depends on your recovery. I pushed for a timeframe. At least 6 months, maybe a year. It hits me. I won’t be able to compete in May. My heart sinks. I swallow hard around the lump in my throat. I have no idea when or if I will even be able to start training again. That devastated me. I sat in the parking lot for 10 – 15 minutes alone and crying, trying to let it all sink in. More than one person had told me that BJJ is a lifestyle, not till I was faced with never being able to do it again did I realize how much a part of my life BJJ has become.

I then drove to the hospital to get my blood work and other surgery preparation done. Yes, and work on another mountain of paperwork. However, this paperwork was different. Do you have a living will? Are you an organ donor? Will anyone be with you on the day of surgery? How can we contact your next of kin? How are you going to pay? Then it moved to instruction time: no eating past midnight, wash your body and hair with this microbial surgical scrub, check in by this time, do not bring any valuables, etc. I made a mental note of the location of the Chapel before I left.

My Injury Women’s MMA

I went to class that evening to take notes on technique. It was our Women’s class. As usual, class was great. Only I wasn’t in a gi. As I watched mat time, I was hit unexpectedly with a surge of anger I could barely suppress. I had to step outside to calm down. It passes. I have a conscious thought that I do not want to hold on to any negativity. I have worked hard for peace and balance in my life and I will keep it! I have a friend in the class I’ve known for about six years, Stephanie. She’s also my training partner. She could sense I was “off ”. She gives me a gift after class that was intended for my birthday, which now happened to also be my surgery date. She says, with a warm smile, it’s a “get well” gift now. It is a pewter figurine representative of the nickname given to me by my instructor. It is a Valkyrie. There she stands all of six inches tall with her sword drawn, shield ready, and wings spread looking so triumphant. The irony is not lost on me. Everyone else has left class now. Stephanie reaches out and gives me a hug and I cry on her shoulder, it is hitting me, I’m feeling everything but triumphant. I am disappointed, hurt, and angry. My life is being interrupted and I am scared of going under anesthesia. I got it out of my system and refused to cry again. Thank God for wonderful friends to lean on.

Wednesday, March 5, 2003. Surgery day. Birthday. Ash Wednesday. The stars are lining up, but for what? I have showered and washed my hair in the cleanser given to me by the hospital. “This definitely rules out being able to make a pass at any good-looking available male I might come across during my adventure in the hospital,” I think as I shower. Not that the flattering backless “gown” they provide gives you much to work with anyway, but I digress. My parents and I check in and are sent to a waiting area before being taken to the surgical floor. My mother and I cannot just sit and wait. We are both anxious. My parents head to the gift shop to look around and I head to the Chapel. I had been thinking a lot since Friday. It’s my birthday, surgery is scheduled almost to the minute I was born, and it’s Ash Wednesday. Today, the meditation time I would have with God would be different than my usual conversation and prayer. On my knees at the altar, I prayed.

The patient advocate locates my parents and I in the gift shop and we are escorted to the surgical floor. My parents are asked to wait as I am taken to my pre-surgery room to change into my “gown”. Visions of a crown on my head, my arms full of roses, and my right hand performing a parade queen wave, this movement is where only the elbow and wrist are moved slowly back and forth as the tricep stays parallel with the ground. This wave has always been a tongue-in-cheek joke with my girlfriends. My runway is the hospital corridor. I reprimand myself immediately for having such a lame hallucination and I can’t even blame it on the drugs because I haven’t been given any yet. I’m blessed with a vivid imagination and an odd sense of humor that assists me well in coping with stress. That is the best explanation I can offer for what just happened. Reality sets in as I sign the last of the hospital consent forms and the nurse puts in my IV. After I speak to my anesthesiologist, my parents are allowed to join me while I wait.

My Injury Women’s MMA

A member of the Operating Room team comes to retrieve me. Here we go. I am staged outside the OR while they finish sterilizing a few instruments that will be used to clamp and dissect my neck and hip. A male OR assistant asks, “Are you the Jiu-Jitsu girl?” Nervously confident, I say, “Yes!” “I guess we better get it right, then.” He quips. “I recommend it!” I respond scornfully followed by a wink. The anesthesiologist starts my medications. As I was told later, everyone sang me Happy Birthday as I went under. Awww! I don’t remember this at all, but I was apparently awake and being my normal quirky self. Hours later, I wake up in the recovery room. “How are you feeling? Is there anything I can do for you?” the nurse asks. “I’m starving!” I respond. “I know” she chuckles. My facial expression obviously communicates my bewilderment. She explains further, “this is about the fifth time you’ve told me that.” I laugh. It is truly surreal to not be aware when you are conscious and talking to other people. It’s just not natural! Right there is why I could never get into drugs. After we discuss the liquid diet I’m supposed to be on, I tell her, “I need real food – protein!” She tells me, “Honey, the cafeteria is already closed.” “My daddy is out there…he loves me…he’ll go get me a turkey sandwich”, I retort emphatically as any good 32-year-old woman would who feels like she is 6-years-old again. Off she goes to inform my father of the humanitarian mission his daughter dutifully expects him to accept and fulfill. Take heart fathers, there is your proof that women are always their Daddy’s little girls.

My parents and I are taken from recovery to my assigned room. They are wheeling my bed in and I look to see my fellow students and friends waiting for me to arrive. My heart is touched and the lump that has been in my throat since my first visit with Dr. Hansen has disappeared. They proceed to tell me who had stopped by, called, and emailed. My school has not only given me great training partners over the last nine months, I am proud to have them as my friends. They are truly wonderful people. I have discovered great people and friends in BJJ. My voicemail and email had been receiving messages wishing me well and offering encouragement from fellow BJJ junkies and friends. Stephanie passed on to me that a thread was started in the “Women’s Locker Room” at www.jiu-jitsu.net by a friend I haven’t even had the pleasure to actually meet yet, Amanda. Laura, who is from the same forum, overwhelmed me with her email. The response from the female BJJ community there, and even a few males that popped in, was just awesome. My friends, who don’t quite understand my fascination with this sport I’ve discovered, but who love me anyway, were just as supportive. Moments like these have a way of reminding you of what is truly important in life, being surrounded by family and friends that care for you. I check with the nurse to make sure it would not be a problem if they stayed awhile, as it was already past visiting hours. She says, “It’s fine, as long as you can keep it down.” I immediately think, “How does she know I’m not exactly known for being quiet?” Then I remember we are in a hospital and she says that all day. We all agree to be quiet. As I ravage my turkey sandwich, (my Dad is the greatest Dad in the world!) Dr. Hansen comes in. “Oh, you’re eating!” he sounds surprised. “How’s your arm?” he asks. As I chew and hold my sandwich with the right hand, I flail my left arm around like a monkey looking for a tree limb. “I guess you’re feeling better,” he states. Everyone laughs. I nod as I was concentrating on chewing and digesting. My parents leave and head back to my house to get some much-needed rest. They had driven in from Oklahoma to be with me during surgery and it had been a long day for them. The guys stay till about midnight when I tell them I am falling asleep on them and I don’t want to be rude, but I need to say goodbye while I still can. I don’t remember what we talked about for two hours, but I do remember Rob ate my candy! I guess anesthesia gives you selective memory and that chocolate must have been important to me.

My recovery is going well. My surgeon used a plastic surgeon’s technique on the incisions and therefore they are not expected to scar. The incisions on my neck and hip are about three inches. After surgery, the bandages needed to be changed daily for ten days. My hip was uncomfortable to walk on for the first week, and for the next couple of weeks I waddled like a pregnant woman. I have almost completed my physical therapy for my left arm and right leg (hip). I am still experiencing weakness in my left arm (it’s about 80 % of my right) and slight numbness in my thumb and forearm. Full recovery is expected with both in the next couple of months. The lingering annoyance of surgery is the effect on my voice. Moving my vocal chords out of the way during the surgery to get to my cervical spine stretched them. The stretch causes the nerves in the voice box harm that only time can heal. I sound like Minnie Mouse when my tone is high and Jessica Rabbit when my tone is low, and have no voice at all if volume is needed. Translation: I cannot yell. This too has a humorous twist. My friends and co-workers are accustomed to hearing me before they see me. Let’s just say my normal voice has a tendency to carry. I’ve been having lots of fun sneaking up on people. Ha Ha! And now when I look at my Valkyrie figurine that Stephanie gave me I feel every bit as triumphant as she appears! Well, I am just past the two month mark from surgery and focused on getting back on the mat.

This is just my injury story. However, there is nothing unique at all about my story. I have come across many injury stories just in my academy alone. I even found a kindred spirit of sorts discovering a fellow student that has had exactly the same surgery I did. We have matching incision marks! His surgery was in 1999 and he started BJJ in 2001, and is now a blue belt. He will be my measuring stick. Besides him, we have one student who has had both knees replaced, one who experienced a broken neck (complete with traction), another with a broken foot, and still others with bulging discs, multiple muscle strains, torn ligaments, cracked ribs, and bruises. “Bruises are battle scars”, my instructor tells me. I am every bit a feminine woman, but new bruises are like my proof of progress, a physical sign of my effort. Therefore, I wear my bruises proudly and usually boast about them. The interesting thing about most of the injuries listed above, including mine, is that they were not sustained as a result of the practice of BJJ. The fact is Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu truly is a “gentle art”. Injuries may interfere with our training but they do not keep us off the mat. This martial art is full of dedicated students training around injuries because they love BJJ. I intend to stay one of them.

I wake up one Sunday morning, like any other Sunday morning, stretch and head to the kitchen to grind my coffee that I cannot live without. Hmmmm, that’s weird – my left arm feels numb and tingly from the shoulder to my fingertips. I surmise I must have slept on it funny. I move it around working the range of motion, opening and closing my fist, and decide to move along through my day. I need that cup of coffee. Run a few errands, clean a little, and then, it is dinner at a friend’s house. I clear the dishes and clean the kitchen for being fed so well. It is approximately 9 P.M. I decide I will take in a little of the massage chair, as by now my arm is aching moderately, mostly in the shoulder region. Hmmm, highest heat setting, most active mode, and deepest motion it will offer. Not too bad. I recline. I sit back up within a minute or two. Okay, that isn’t helping…I think it may have made it worse? I turn it off and sit and relax for a few minutes. It is not getting any better. My friend comes to check on me, and doesn’t like the look on my face apparently, “Do you need to go to the emergency room?” he offers. After I get over the fact that I can’t just grin and bear it anymore, I let him know I need to go to the emergency room. Off we go.

“What happened?” they ask. “Nothing”, I say, “I woke up this way.” Four hours, three x-rays, mountain of paperwork (what did you eat for breakfast 26 days ago?) in between tears of pain, and one Phenergan/Morphine shot that took them three hours to give me…and they tell me, “You need to see a neurosurgeon. Do not move your arm till you do.” Potential paralysis has not entered my mind at this point. Here is a sling and the prescription orders. Treat ‘em and Street ‘em. Okay, I’ve had better evenings.

On Monday, after I woke from my drug-induced sleep and have had my IV of…I mean cup of…coffee, I call my PCP (Primary Care Physician) for a referral to a neurosurgeon. He has to see you before he will refer. Of course he does! He wants his piece of the managed care pie! I work in the managed care health system, excuse the sarcasm. He needs to make sure the ER doctor knows his way around a stethoscope. First available is tomorrow. Okay. Tuesday morning at 6 A.M., I receive a call. My appointment has been cancelled due to bad weather that has come in (the sidewalks of Austin, Texas roll up for two days because we have not a single clue how to drive in a little ice and snow). I keep leaving messages trying to reschedule. I finally receive a return call on Friday and they can see me on Monday afternoon. I can hear my mother in my head, “Your eyes will get stuck like that!” as I roll my eyes at how helpful and understanding my doctor’s office is being. It’s a good thing my southern manners and the medication I was taking slowed my usual quick verbal wit.

On Monday, and after another mountain of paperwork, my PCP’s assistant decides I need to see a neurosurgeon. (Surprise!) Refer back to the third paragraph to see where a week of my life went. Hey, at this point, I’m doing the best I can to cope. The nurse gives me the referral and calls to get me in ASAP. First available is Friday morning. Obviously, my ASAP is different from their ASAP. Arrrgggghhhhh! I do not make a very good patient and I haven’t been training! Tracey is not a happy girl. Before Friday, I have to go by Austin Radiological Association and have a MRI done. I spend most of Wednesday doing that because they handle requests like this on a walk-in basis only. The MRI itself wasn’t too bad. However, my decision to be cremated is absolutely unquestionable now. There is no way my soul would be at peace in a coffin. Of course, as soon as I got home, I had the films out, holding them up to the dining room light, twisting and turning trying to understand them. I wasn’t quite prepared to see what I looked like without skin. Weird, but interesting.

Friday has come, I am in the waiting area alone trying to think positively and working on yet another mountain of paperwork. Would it kill these people to communicate with one another! Geez. I’m already driving a standard with one hand! Where’s Big Brother when you need them? Focus, focus, positive energy only! A little physical therapy and I’m good as new. Ways to train around this injury have been going through my head for days now. Guard work, I’ll work on my bottom game – my guard is horrible anyway and needs the work!

My Injury Women’s MMA

Dr. Hansen and I begin to talk. “Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, anything like the Japanese form?” he asks. Okay, that’s what I’m talking about! I’m immediately at ease, and have completely forgotten how irritated I was in the waiting room, as I spend several minutes explaining everything I know about the similarities and differences between the two forms. BJJ has become one of my favorite conversation pieces over the last year. Realizing we have gotten side tracked, he looks at my MRI’s. I can tell by his face I’m not going to like what he says. “What happened?” he asks. Again, I tell “the I woke up this way” story. He points to C2/C3 on my MRI showing normal disc separation, location of spinal fluid, and my spine. Cool. We then move to C4-C7. Not so cool. At C3/C4, about one-third of my spine is visible. At C4/C5, C5/C6, and C6/C7, it is not visible at all. Now, paralysis crosses my mind. “This has been degenerating for a while,” he states, “Has there been any jarring trauma, a fall, a car accident?” Light bulbs go off in my head and my memory was jogged: rear-ended, “whiplash”, over a year ago, my neck and shoulders have hurt ever since. Grappling or Yoga may have aggravated it or I could have just moved and hit the right place while I was sleeping. No way to really know the exact sequence of events that caused the actual herniation that hit several nerve roots in my cervical spine and rendered my left arm useless and painful. To make it worse, my right arm was already exhibiting the same symptoms of nerve damage. Bottom line. Surgery. Fusion. The next few minutes are a blur, Dr. Hansen is explaining the procedure and showing me the titanium plate and eight screws that will be surgically fused into my spine along with using bone chipped from my hip to replace the discs being removed. Do not go to this kind of appointment alone. Take someone that can think of all the questions you want to ask, when you suddenly are not able to think straight at all. I was doing relatively okay till I asked about resuming my normal physical activities. A lot depends on your recovery. I pushed for a timeframe. At least 6 months, maybe a year. It hits me. I won’t be able to compete in May. My heart sinks. I swallow hard around the lump in my throat. I have no idea when or if I will even be able to start training again. That devastated me. I sat in the parking lot for 10 – 15 minutes alone and crying, trying to let it all sink in. More than one person had told me that BJJ is a lifestyle, not till I was faced with never being able to do it again did I realize how much a part of my life BJJ has become.

I then drove to the hospital to get my blood work and other surgery preparation done. Yes, and work on another mountain of paperwork. However, this paperwork was different. Do you have a living will? Are you an organ donor? Will anyone be with you on the day of surgery? How can we contact your next of kin? How are you going to pay? Then it moved to instruction time: no eating past midnight, wash your body and hair with this microbial surgical scrub, check in by this time, do not bring any valuables, etc. I made a mental note of the location of the Chapel before I left.

My Injury Women’s MMA

I went to class that evening to take notes on technique. It was our Women’s class. As usual, class was great. Only I wasn’t in a gi. As I watched mat time, I was hit unexpectedly with a surge of anger I could barely suppress. I had to step outside to calm down. It passes. I have a conscious thought that I do not want to hold on to any negativity. I have worked hard for peace and balance in my life and I will keep it! I have a friend in the class I’ve known for about six years, Stephanie. She’s also my training partner. She could sense I was “off ”. She gives me a gift after class that was intended for my birthday, which now happened to also be my surgery date. She says, with a warm smile, it’s a “get well” gift now. It is a pewter figurine representative of the nickname given to me by my instructor. It is a Valkyrie. There she stands all of six inches tall with her sword drawn, shield ready, and wings spread looking so triumphant. The irony is not lost on me. Everyone else has left class now. Stephanie reaches out and gives me a hug and I cry on her shoulder, it is hitting me, I’m feeling everything but triumphant. I am disappointed, hurt, and angry. My life is being interrupted and I am scared of going under anesthesia. I got it out of my system and refused to cry again. Thank God for wonderful friends to lean on.

My Injury Women’s MMA

Wednesday, March 5, 2003. Surgery day. Birthday. Ash Wednesday. The stars are lining up, but for what? I have showered and washed my hair in the cleanser given to me by the hospital. “This definitely rules out being able to make a pass at any good-looking available male I might come across during my adventure in the hospital,” I think as I shower. Not that the flattering backless “gown” they provide gives you much to work with anyway, but I digress. My parents and I check in and are sent to a waiting area before being taken to the surgical floor. My mother and I cannot just sit and wait. We are both anxious. My parents head to the gift shop to look around and I head to the Chapel. I had been thinking a lot since Friday. It’s my birthday, surgery is scheduled almost to the minute I was born, and it’s Ash Wednesday. Today, the meditation time I would have with God would be different than my usual conversation and prayer. On my knees at the altar, I prayed.

My Injury Women’s MMA

The patient advocate locates my parents and I in the gift shop and we are escorted to the surgical floor. My parents are asked to wait as I am taken to my pre-surgery room to change into my “gown”. Visions of a crown on my head, my arms full of roses, and my right hand performing a parade queen wave, this movement is where only the elbow and wrist are moved slowly back and forth as the tricep stays parallel with the ground. This wave has always been a tongue-in-cheek joke with my girlfriends. My runway is the hospital corridor. I reprimand myself immediately for having such a lame hallucination and I can’t even blame it on the drugs because I haven’t been given any yet. I’m blessed with a vivid imagination and an odd sense of humor that assists me well in coping with stress. That is the best explanation I can offer for what just happened. Reality sets in as I sign the last of the hospital consent forms and the nurse puts in my IV. After I speak to my anesthesiologist, my parents are allowed to join me while I wait.

My Injury Women’s MMA

A member of the Operating Room team comes to retrieve me. Here we go. I am staged outside the OR while they finish sterilizing a few instruments that will be used to clamp and dissect my neck and hip. A male OR assistant asks, “Are you the Jiu-Jitsu girl?” Nervously confident, I say, “Yes!” “I guess we better get it right, then.” He quips. “I recommend it!” I respond scornfully followed by a wink. The anesthesiologist starts my medications. As I was told later, everyone sang me Happy Birthday as I went under. Awww! I don’t remember this at all, but I was apparently awake and being my normal quirky self. Hours later, I wake up in the recovery room. “How are you feeling? Is there anything I can do for you?” the nurse asks. “I’m starving!” I respond. “I know” she chuckles. My facial expression obviously communicates my bewilderment. She explains further, “this is about the fifth time you’ve told me that.” I laugh. It is truly surreal to not be aware when you are conscious and talking to other people. It’s just not natural! Right there is why I could never get into drugs. After we discuss the liquid diet I’m supposed to be on, I tell her, “I need real food – protein!” She tells me, “Honey, the cafeteria is already closed.” “My daddy is out there…he loves me…he’ll go get me a turkey sandwich”, I retort emphatically as any good 32-year-old woman would who feels like she is 6-years-old again. Off she goes to inform my father of the humanitarian mission his daughter dutifully expects him to accept and fulfill. Take heart fathers, there is your proof that women are always their Daddy’s little girls.

My Injury Women’s MMA

My parents and I are taken from recovery to my assigned room. They are wheeling my bed in and I look to see my fellow students and friends waiting for me to arrive. My heart is touched and the lump that has been in my throat since my first visit with Dr. Hansen has disappeared. They proceed to tell me who had stopped by, called, and emailed. My school has not only given me great training partners over the last nine months, I am proud to have them as my friends. They are truly wonderful people. I have discovered great people and friends in BJJ. My voicemail and email had been receiving messages wishing me well and offering encouragement from fellow BJJ junkies and friends. Stephanie passed on to me that a thread was started in the “Women’s Locker Room” at www.jiu-jitsu.net by a friend I haven’t even had the pleasure to actually meet yet, Amanda. Laura, who is from the same forum, overwhelmed me with her email. The response from the female BJJ community there, and even a few males that popped in, was just awesome. My friends, who don’t quite understand my fascination with this sport I’ve discovered, but who love me anyway, were just as supportive. Moments like these have a way of reminding you of what is truly important in life, being surrounded by family and friends that care for you. I check with the nurse to make sure it would not be a problem if they stayed awhile, as it was already past visiting hours. She says, “It’s fine, as long as you can keep it down.” I immediately think, “How does she know I’m not exactly known for being quiet?” Then I remember we are in a hospital and she says that all day. We all agree to be quiet. As I ravage my turkey sandwich, (my Dad is the greatest Dad in the world!) Dr. Hansen comes in. “Oh, you’re eating!” he sounds surprised. “How’s your arm?” he asks. As I chew and hold my sandwich with the right hand, I flail my left arm around like a monkey looking for a tree limb. “I guess you’re feeling better,” he states. Everyone laughs. I nod as I was concentrating on chewing and digesting. My parents leave and head back to my house to get some much-needed rest. They had driven in from Oklahoma to be with me during surgery and it had been a long day for them. The guys stay till about midnight when I tell them I am falling asleep on them and I don’t want to be rude, but I need to say goodbye while I still can. I don’t remember what we talked about for two hours, but I do remember Rob ate my candy! I guess anesthesia gives you selective memory and that chocolate must have been important to me.

My Injury Women’s MMA

My recovery is going well. My surgeon used a plastic surgeon’s technique on the incisions and therefore they are not expected to scar. The incisions on my neck and hip are about three inches. After surgery, the bandages needed to be changed daily for ten days. My hip was uncomfortable to walk on for the first week, and for the next couple of weeks I waddled like a pregnant woman. I have almost completed my physical therapy for my left arm and right leg (hip). I am still experiencing weakness in my left arm (it’s about 80 % of my right) and slight numbness in my thumb and forearm. Full recovery is expected with both in the next couple of months. The lingering annoyance of surgery is the effect on my voice. Moving my vocal chords out of the way during the surgery to get to my cervical spine stretched them. The stretch causes the nerves in the voice box harm that only time can heal. I sound like Minnie Mouse when my tone is high and Jessica Rabbit when my tone is low, and have no voice at all if volume is needed. Translation: I cannot yell. This too has a humorous twist. My friends and co-workers are accustomed to hearing me before they see me. Let’s just say my normal voice has a tendency to carry. I’ve been having lots of fun sneaking up on people. Ha Ha! And now when I look at my Valkyrie figurine that Stephanie gave me I feel every bit as triumphant as she appears! Well, I am just past the two month mark from surgery and focused on getting back on the mat.

My Injury Women’s MMA

This is just my injury story. However, there is nothing unique at all about my story. I have come across many injury stories just in my academy alone. I even found a kindred spirit of sorts discovering a fellow student that has had exactly the same surgery I did. We have matching incision marks! His surgery was in 1999 and he started BJJ in 2001, and is now a blue belt. He will be my measuring stick. Besides him, we have one student who has had both knees replaced, one who experienced a broken neck (complete with traction), another with a broken foot, and still others with bulging discs, multiple muscle strains, torn ligaments, cracked ribs, and bruises. “Bruises are battle scars”, my instructor tells me. I am every bit a feminine woman, but new bruises are like my proof of progress, a physical sign of my effort. Therefore, I wear my bruises proudly and usually boast about them. The interesting thing about most of the injuries listed above, including mine, is that they were not sustained as a result of the practice of BJJ. The fact is Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu truly is a “gentle art”. Injuries may interfere with our training but they do not keep us off the mat. This martial art is full of dedicated students training around injuries because they love BJJ. I intend to stay one of them.

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Women’s MMA Monthly Newsletter

Women’s MMA Monthly Newsletter We are back, bigger, stronger and faster. That’s right the Fightergirls.com newsletter has returned. We hope this one will be leaner and meaner. We are looking for ideas, articles, and columnists!

Women’s MMA Monthly Newsletter

Yes that’s right we are going to add a couple of columns for some of the more colorful forum posters. If you’re interested, email us at . ALSO we have had the hottest (literally and figuratively) thread of all time… UG Poll: Finest Female Fighter trust me, worth checking out…

Women's MMA Monthly Newsletter
Women’s MMA Monthly Newsletter

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Combat Sports Challenge

Combat Sports Challenge Brought to you by Combat Sports 2000 Sanctioned by the WKA USA Hosted by Prodigy Martial Arts Academy. January 31, 2004 at The Show Place in Richmond, VA.

Bertina Lee put her WKA US Title on the line against Emily Beardon in this highly anticipated match up. Their previously scheduled match was canceled due to Lee suffering a broken thumb just prior to that match. Lee came out strong in the first round, landing some great combinations and catching Beardon a bit off guard.

Combat Sports Challenge

Much to her credit, Beardon came out in the second round with some adjustments that allowed her to outscore Lee. The rest of the fight had the classic “power blows” verses “number of touches” judging controversy. Lee clearly established herself with power shots, landing powerful punches and backing Beardon up or stopping her in her tracks.

Combat Sports Challenge
Combat Sports Challenge

To Beardon’s credit, her adjustments paid off in the later rounds allowing her to score with both jabs and foot jabs. In the clinch, it was Lee controlling most of the action. It appeared to most in the crowd that the fight went 3 rounds to 2 for Lee, but the judges had it 48/47, 47/48, 48/47 for Beardon. Hats off to both of these fighters – they put on one heck of a fight. Not just a good ladies match, a GREAT FIGHT.

Beardon will defend her new title against Kate Meehan in New York on February 20, 2004, and then, regardless of that outcome, Meehan is scheduled to face Lee in Florida on March 13, 2004. The last title match was a rematch of the US Title match at the 2003 WKA US Nationals last summer.

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Quest Fight Promotions Initial Impact

Quest Fight Promotions Initial Impact Quest Fight Promotions invades Toledo, Ohio on Saturday, August 9th with ‘Initial Impact’. This is the first show from Quest Fight Promotions and they are ready to treat Mixed Martial Arts fans with a night of heavy hitting amateur fighting. When the fists aren’t flying Tampa Bay, FL band ‘Born Into Kaos’ will take the stage and rock the venue. You can check out the band on their website at Born Into Kaos.

MMA Fight card Toledo

The fight card consists of athletes from across the USA, UK and Canada. “I’m really excited to have the American Top Team represented on this card,” says matchmaker Johnny Walls. “Their name is becoming synonymous with MMA fighting and they always bring their best to the cage. 2001 European BJJ Cup Champion Antony Rea is also a guy to keep your eye on as well as the Ohio fighters who are ready to throw down in front of their hometown fans.

Quest Fight Promotions Initial Impact

I expect explosive action from all of these fighters and several will probably be competing for Quest title belts in the future. We’ll also have a special ‘Underground Forum’ bout between Jamie Levine and Matt Hershberger. Hershberger is a beast but I hear that Levine will be ready.”

Quest Fight Promotions Initial Impact
Quest Fight Promotions Initial Impact

Promoter Frank Vazquez is ready to get it on in the Octagon with ‘Initial Impact.

“We kept the fans in mind and combined our talents to bring together a great fight card and Rock performance,” Frank says. “Toledo being a great location with an impressive venue will allow fans from Detroit, Cleveland, and Canada to make the trip to see this premiere fighting event.”

Tickets are available at the Toledo SeaGate Box Office and can be purchased by phone at 419-255-3300 and at all Ticketmaster locations.

*Card Tentative and Subject to change.

Featured Fights:

205 Pounds – Light Heavyweight Marcel Ferreira VS Antony Rea (American Top Team, FL) (France)

155 Pounds – Lightweight Nick Spencer VS Jacob Draves (Next Level Fight Club, Steubenville, OH) (Wrecking Crew, OH)

Special “Underground Forum” Match 205 Pounds – Light Heavyweight Jamie Levine VS Matt Hershberger (FL) (OH)

Main Card

185 Pounds – Light Heavyweight Leo Sylvest VS German Reyes (Integrated Fighting, IN) (Chicago, IL)

185 Pounds – Middleweight Emyr Bussard VS Chris Myers (American Top Team, FL) (OH)

170 Pounds – Welterweight Dave Campbell VS Wald Bloise (Boreland’s Combat Team, Canada) (American Top Team, FL)

170 Pounds – Welterweight Jason Ory VS Grant Sarver (The Regulators, AZ) (Wrecking Crew, OH)

155 Pounds – Lightweight Luke Spencer VS Brian McIntyre (Next Level Fight Club, Steubenville, OH) (Boreland’s Combat Team, Canada)

145 Pounds – Featherweight Dan Swift VS Johnny Bedford (The PA Hitman) (Wrecking Crew, OH)

Heavyweight Joe Grant VS Tim Brown (The Regulators, AZ) (OH)

145 Pounds – Featherweight Billy Mitchell VS Mike Large (Tap or Snap) (Boreland’s Combat Team, Canada)

Please visit https://www.fightergirls.com for more detailed information

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Strength building for MMA fighters!

Strength building for MMA fighters Debi Purcell explains her strength training routines for female MMA fighters an training for MMA . Ms Purcell is a women’s mixed martial arts pioneer and female fighter. Lets ask Debi what it takes to be the best female fighter and what to expect when it comes to training for fights and mixed martial arts.

Explain your weekly MMA routine:

Debi Purcell I lift weights 3 to 4 times a week. Doing each body part at least once, and always switching up my routine. I usually break it up doing back and shoulders, one day, Biceps and chest, and then triceps and Legs. I work my ABS once a day (skip Sunday) and try to do calf work at least a few times a week. I do not lift very heavy weights any more. And tend to try to circuit train as much as possible. I also do plyo metric training with weights on top of my regular weight-training program a few times a week, which allows me to target important body parts that I use for fighting. Such as shoulders, back and legs. I am very fond of *cleans* and jumps, and. Every so often I will go for *heavy* lifts to try to peak at a certain weight.

Strength building for MMA fighters
Strength building for MMA fighters

Explain your philosophy on strength building for MMA fighters:

I believe that lifting weights is a KEY factor is fight training, as strength is so important for us. What I am learning through my years of lifting is that THE way you lift is the most important thing; I think too many fighters make the mistake of bodybuilding instead of strength training, especially when it comes to lifting weights. For years I did the typical body builder routine, and although it gave me a strong foundation to start with and a certain physic I am proud of, It is not conducive to my fighting to lift that way, Bulk muscle is not as useful to fighters as the explosive lean muscle mass used for fighting.

Strength building for MMA fighters

Tearing down muscle tissue, and not having time to let it heal properly obviously has negative effects, as fighters this causes a problem, Because we use some of those same muscles in our every day fight training. And it could lead to a greater chance of injury for us. Another key factor in strength training for fighting is *flexibility, One must keep this in mind when they decide on a lifting program, as flexibility it’s SO important for us in this sport. I learned years ago with my gymnastic training that strength training and flexibility can go hand in hand, and For fighting the muscles MUST be pliable, so I stretch in between sets, before, after, as MUCH as I can. Any chance I get. I am emphatic about it for me moving and stay warm is the key. . This will also help keep injuries down. It is much harder to keep the body flexible with bulk muscle mass. And one should take this into consideration before they add lifting heavy weights to their repertoire.

The biggest mistake I make when training, has to do with my own vanity, I will sometimes lift more then I should because I know it will give me a certain look that I like to have. I think it’s important to remember why you are lifting weights. Is it for your looks or for your sports performance? Me personally, I do it for both, and that works for me. However I am very aware that just because a fighter has *large* muscles and a certain physic, does not necessarily mean they are training the best way for MMA, keep in mind the bigger and buffer those muscles are the more energy and oxygen they are going to need during your fight, and in a sport where having good wind is worth more then gold this really is an aspect one must pay attention too. Also those *big* muscles are not going to relax easy on you either, and when they are getting pounded on or being used during your fight you might be more prone to injury.

Strength building for MMA fighters

Last year I spent my time training without heavy weights, and focused a lot more on my fight training and plyo’s, I was amazed that when I went back to trying to lift heavy, I could actually lift more weight then I had been able too before. IN truth I am not 100% sure why, it is just something that happened that I wanted to share Lastly, remember that every “body” is different; I suggest trying to diversify your routine often to see how YOUR body reacts and what gives YOU the best results, ultimately let your body be the judge of what works, and what does not, and perhaps someday you will have a nice body like me (Laugh) Just seeing if your paying attention. 😉

Do you change up your routine when you are training for a fight:

Yes, absolutely about a month prior I cut lifting down to only doing plyo metric lifting, and a few weeks before cut it out completely, I do this mainly because The training gets so intense my body would not have time to recover properly If I did not discard it from my regular lifting program.

How long have you been weight training?

I started really getting into lifting when I was 16. Prior to that I did gymnastics and danced so I have been doing some form of strength training from the time I was about 6 years old.

What got you into weight training?

From early child hood I understood the benefits of being strong for a sport. And I love pushing my body it to its limit. That, and when I went to my first actual lifting gym, there was a woman in there who had a really cool looking body in my opinion. I started to ask her questions, she gave me some tips and from there I was hooked.

Who do you see as a role model in weight training and bodybuilding?

I still adore the way Cory Everson looks; her and Rachel Mclish have always been my favorite. Perhaps because they brought bodybuilding to the public eye for females. I also have learned a lot from my good friend Chuck Williams who is a personal trainer and ex competitive body builder, and still am amazed at how much my coach Marco Ruas knows and teaches me about strength training for fighting

A quick note to all the females out there. Lifting weights *will* improve your strength and sports performance. If you get frustrated at not being able to lift much at first, just remember that as with anything it takes time and patience. so KEEP at it.

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Debi Purcell fighter girls gym Debi Purcell - Founder of Fighter Girls Debi Purcell

Debi Purcell MMA fighter
Whiplash! Queen of the cage
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Mind Muscle Motivation Mayra Conde

Mind Muscle Motivation Mayra Conde
Mind Muscle Motivation Mayra Conde

Mind Muscle Motivation Mayra Conde At 5′ 4″, 160 pounds, Mayra Conde has built herself up from solitude to solid muscle, conquering every challenge in her wake. She’s a dead ringer for actress Maria Conchita Alonso, but her bodybuilder physique and Brazilian jiu-jitsu background have prepared her for a different kind of performance. Hook n Shoot: Revolution will give Conde her first major showcase after years of competing in smaller and lesser-known shows.

About female fighter Mayra Conde

Born in Guatemala City, Conde grew up on a farm with her grandparents. She enjoyed the peaceful nature and warmth of her rural setting. “My grandfather was my source of strength and he always gave me the will to succeed at anything I set out to do,” said Conde, who developed a special bond with him when she was learning to ride horses. That sense of comfort was disrupted when Conde’s parents asked the nine-year-old to move to Toronto, Canada to be with them. Her grandparents knew it was the right thing for her to do, with more opportunities and a better education.

Early age of Mayra Conde

In Canada, Conde was thrown into a harsh world she could not understand. “I was constantly picked on because I couldn’t speak English and I was very small,” she said. To make matters worse, her parents insisted that she speak Spanish at home and English at school. Without a tutor or special arrangements, Conde took class just like everyone else and had to learn a foreign language as she went along. Remarkably, Conde never failed a grade and was able to speak and understand English within two years. Today, she’s bilingual and happy her parents wanted her to know both languages.

Having few friends, Conde counted on the one person who couldn’t let her down-herself. When her father introduced her to sports drinks and nutrition, Conde began to read bodybuilding magazines starting in the sixth grade. “I was infatuated with nutrition and being stronger and bigger at such an early age,” said Conde, who began bodybuilding at age 16. After seeing results, Conde gained a newfound confidence in herself and overcame the negativity that had surrounded her. For once in her life, she was in control of the situation and “trying to challenge my personal best all the time.”

Now in high school, Conde found her results paying off in other ways. “I remember going to the weight room and people were amazed at how strong I was and I started making friends,” she said. “I started doing heavy bench and guys would invite me to work out with them.” Before long, Conde was fending off dates and getting compliments about her muscular figure.

After high school, Conde obtained her labor card and made a living in construction. As a welder by trade, she even worked as a foreman and enjoyed the ease of availability for work. Ironically, her family was not supportive of her physical transformation at first, as Conde pointed out that “in Latin America, you are supposed to be pregnant by age 20.” Competition was at the heart of her physique. In August 1998, without any grappling experience, Conde won first place in the women’s heavyweight division in the Canadian Grapplers Challenge. She defeated both of her opponents quickly, the first one by guillotine choke. “It was a natural movement when she shot in on me,” said Conde. “People asked me how long I had been grappling and I said that I needed to get started.”

Mayra Conde Female Body Builder

But bodybuilding was something she could always rely on and in late 1998, she moved to California to be closer to Venice Beach-the Mecca of bodybuilding. She left Canada with Olga Bakalopoulos, a friend whom she had met at a bench press competition. Bakalopoulos was the perfect roommate, since she didn’t mind the bodybuilding lifestyle of egg whites and crazy shakes that mere mortals could hardly stomach. Conde trained her and before long, Bakalopoulous could bench press over 200 pounds and leg press over 800 pounds.

Mayra Conde begins Mixed Martial Arts

Yearning for something new, Conde walked into Beverly Hills Jiu Jitsu Club and marveled at Mark Kerr’s explosiveness while being so massive. She decided to take some lessons not realizing where it would take her. After only seven weeks of classes, her trainer Bas Rutten asked her to compete in the Bas Rutten Invitational, a feeder MMA show held in Denver, Colorado. Conde eagerly accepted the challenge.

In February 1999, Conde went into the Bas Rutten Invitational with an open mind and the determination to win. Her opponent, Kelsey Beard, reportedly had three years of kickboxing experience. “When I fought, I had my guard down the whole time because I wanted to find out what it was like to get hit; I wanted to find out if this was for me or not,” said Conde. “When she finally hit me in the face, I remember thinking, ‘This is nothing.'” Conde took Beard to the ground and pounded her out. “Once I get into a fight, perhaps that darkest moment in my childhood creeps back and tells me to not let ‘them’ get the best of me now. I want to have control over my opponents; I want to have control over the challenges that face me,” she said.

In June 1999, Conde returned to Bas Rutten Invitational III to fight Jennifer Howe in MMA, but Howe didn’t show up. Conde, who had gone to Denver on her own dime and slept on wrestling mats at the gym since she couldn’t afford a hotel, was devastated. “I told the promoter to put me in anything. I didn’t care if it was boxing or kickboxing; I just wanted to compete,” she said. Without any standup experience, Conde faced Melissa Hutcheson in a kickboxing bout and completely dominated her. The referee stopped the fight in the second round-only the altitude gave her a hard time.

The win gave Conde the confidence to continue and Rutten turned her on to Marcus Vinicius, Beverly Hills Jiu Jitsu Club’s resident BJJ instructor. “I learned so much more than just grappling from taking BJJ and like the fact that I can close the distance between me and my opponent,” said Conde, who still sees Rutten as her mentor. “Bas has taught me a lot more about how to be a great fighter and how to judge your instincts.”

Mayra Conde Female BJJ State Champion

In 2000, Conde competed in four events. After winning first place in the California State Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Championships in March of that year, she fought her second MMA bout in Mark Hall’s Cobra Challenge against a 5’9″, 210-pound Samoan. Using her strength, Conde took her opponent down, maintained control and punished her with rib shots. As she turned over, Conde choked her out.

Taking 1st place in the heavyweight and absolute divisions in the U.S. Open Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Championships in California prompted Conde to once again test her personal best. She traveled by herself to Lamia, Greece to compete in the first World Wide Pankration Championships. Under pankration athlima rules, competitors wore gi-like uniforms and were not allowed to strike to the face, but kicks and punches to the body were allowed, and so were submissions. Conde thought she would fight over a dozen times, but many of the competing countries did not have women in her weight class. She ended up fighting three times and took home two gold medals. “One girl I fought was the captain of the Israeli police force who had 18 years of martial arts experience,” said Conde. “She did absolutely nothing; I took her down and that was that.”

The following year, Conde flew to Brazil to compete in the World Wide Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Championships. Competing in the absolute division, Conde faced a much heavier and more skilled opponent. “She had already won the Pan Ams and she was awarded the purple belt after she beat me on points,” said Conde, who returned home with a bronze medal.

Conde finished 2001 with three more 1st place tournament victories in Brazilian jiu-jitsu. Now focused on MMA, she sees her fight in Hook n Shoot as her reawakening. “I was very happy that someone out there believed in women for this sport because there are enough women out there that people can get interested in and do something with,” said Conde. “If we, as the fighters, give the public a good show, then we’ll get the respect we deserve.”

Mayra Conde Pro Mixed Martial Arts Fighter

Conde will be facing AMC Pankration’s Angela Restad on the April 13 event and says: “She has some skills and hopefully she can keep up with me. I have to test myself against everyone in my weight class.” Training with roommate and fellow Hook n Shoot competitor Olga Bakalopoulos, Conde feels that with her trainer Marcus Vinicius, both will be ready come fight time. She also believes that the spirit of her grandfather is still with her; he passed away last year but her fighting career is dedicated to him. “He’s been a major inspiration to me and he brought me up to be the person that I am today,” she said.

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