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Interviews female fighters

Interview Samantha Teem MMA Fighter

Interview Samantha Teem MMA Fighter

Samantha Teem from Oceanside, California is an amateur MMA fighter and overall wonder woman. All business by day as a CPA and warrior by night in the ring,

Samantha is a true fighter girl that we’re excited to see out there fighting and continuing to make a place for women in the world of mixed martial arts.

New to the game, this girl is pumped and full of potential in a sport which is rapidly growing and ready for a female invasion. Samantha Teem competitive spirit and enthusiasm for the future of women’s MMA is what we here at Fighter Girls love to see!

Interview Samantha Teem

Fighter Girls: How long have you been fighting? What first peaked your interest in MMA?
Sam: I have been fighting for about a year and a half. I got into the sport through my uncle who boxed when I was younger. He was always encouraging me to give it a try and after my first class, I was addicted!

Samantha Teem
Samantha Teem

About Samantha Teem

FG: Is the rest of your family as supportive and encouraging of your fighting as your uncle was?
Sam: Most of my family still has a hard time watching me fight, but they do their best to be supportive.

My mom especially has a hard time with it, she usually refuses to come to my fights because she gets so stressed out.

FG: What gym do you train at?
Sam: I kind of jump around from gym to gym. I do my cardio and boxing at LA Boxing in Carlsbad. I also do Muay Thai sparring at Triple Threat Fighting in Oceanside.

I recently started training at Escondido Fight Club with my coach Adam Griffis. When I fight, I fight under the Blue Ocean Thai Boxing team.

FG: What is your favorite fighting style?
Sam: My favorite style of fighting is Muay Thai because it is so technical and has such an intriguing historical background.

FG: What is a typical day of training like for you?
Sam: A typical day of training for me would begin with either a strength or cardio circuit, followed by technique work on the bag or pad work.

I usually finish it up with a good sparring session, either boxing or Muay Thai depending on the day.

Samantha Teem Female Fighter

FG: How do you feel as a women in a male dominated sport?
Sam: When I first started training, I wasn’t bothered by the fact that I was the only girl in the gym training on that level;

I didn’t really even put that much thought into the issue, that was just how it was. The guys that I train with are awesome; they’re like family to me. For the most part, the only time I really get to train with other females is when I spar.

The few girls that I do spar with are always a source of friendly competition and encouragement; we always push each other to reach our personal bests. I also think it is great for us to be able to compete in this sport and have the chance to prove that women are just as capable as the men.

FG: What do you feel is the greatest hardship for women in MMA?
Sam: Honestly, I don’t really think of what we as women go through in this sport as hardships.

Yes we have to work twice as hard to gain the same amount of respect, and even then there will always be people who will frown on our participation in the sport. But the way I see it, we are simple breaking down gender barriers as every generation of women has done before us; we’re just doing it on a different playing field.

The fact that we have to work so much harder to gain the same respect as the opposite sex just gives us that much more to be proud of. What we’re doing today is opening doors for our daughters and every generation of women yet to come in this field.

FG: What is your nickname and how did you get it?
Sam: My nickname is Bruiser; I’m not really a fan of it but it seems to have stuck. I got the name from my first coach because of how hard I kicked.

FG: What has been your most exciting/favorite fight?
Sam: Without a doubt, my most exciting fight was my recent title fight in Rosarito, Mexico. It was my first semi-pro fight, which I was not made aware of until the morning of.

I was not at all expecting to get in the ring with no head gear or shin guards, but I have to say I absolutely loved it. My opponent pushed me further and tested me more than any other before her.

Even though I lost by decision, it was the most exhilarating experience in the ring as of yet; it brought me to a whole new level as a fighter. I can’t wait for the rematch.

FG: What drives you to continue fighting and training?
Sam: What drives me to continue is all of the potential that the future holds. I love being able to participate in a sport that allows me to push myself and test myself to such extremes.

I simply do this because it is what I love and I can’t imagine my life without it.

FG: And with all of your potential as a fighter, what do you feel the future holds for you and the world of MMA?
Sam: As far as the future goes, I hope to go professional within about a year, depending on how my coach feels.

Overall, I just hope to continue in Muay Thai for as long as my body allows. To earn a title along the way on both the amateur and professional levels would be a dream come true.

FG: As a fighter, you obviously have a very strict eating and workout routine. What is your cheat/guilty pleasure you allow yourself?
Sam: My guilty pleasure when it comes to dieting is California burritos; they’re so addicting!

FG: What is one thing people would be surprised to learn about you?
Sam: One thing people would not expect to learn about me is that I am going to school to become a CPA.

Accountants usually have this stigma attached to them of being “pencil pushers” and very “by the books” so you wouldn’t expect one to be a fighter. But I look forward to changing people’s perceptions on that.

Most of my coworkers don’t even believe me when I tell them about fighting. I usually have to show them a video of a fight for them to really believe me; but they’re usually pretty impressed!

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Published on: Mar 19, 2013 @ 23:59

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Interviews female fighters news women's martial arts MMA

Interview Debi Purcell MMA Pioneer

Interview Debi Purcell MMA Pioneer

Interview Debi Purcell MMA Pioneer  Check out Debi Purcell’s interview with Banana Fusion Magazine. Fighter Girls founder and Women’s MMA pioneer Debi Purcell chats about continuing to live her life to the fullest and what women MMA means to her.

Interview Debi Purcell MMA Pioneer

Hi Debi, please tell us how did you get into this sport?
I started JKD, Muay Thai & boxing when I was pretty young, then later was working out with some of the original UFC fighters before the first UFC and thought when I heard about it, “I am going to do that one day” (laughs), I then moved to South Orange County which was absent of Muay Thai gyms, so I took up Taekwondo and started Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu where one of the Gracie’s was teaching gi after the tkd classes. After that I started training with Chris Brennan where I was introduced to submission grappling and started competing & training in a cage.

I then found Marco Ruas and after working with him for a while and getting my butt kicked daily, I started to feel like a true mixed martial artist. I had been looking to get a fight for a very long time, asking any promoter who would listen but had an impossible time. Finally after so long of me searching, Brad Kohler with UWM found a fight for me so I was able to have my debut in MMA.

Interview Debi Purcell

Debi Purcell Female Mixed Martial Arts Fighter

Debi Purcell (the cheerleader) vs Debi Purcell (the fighter). Why did you make that transition?
I was a cheerleader because my dad was a football coach and my brothers players. As a child, all I really wanted to be was a olympic gymnast, but as I grew into a teenager I was pretty rebellious loving punk music (unpopular at the time) and fighting, so fighting resonated with me more. I was really in love with the training & the philosophy though, and found it a perfect outlet for myself. Since childhood I’ve always had the need to train my body and mind, but never quite felt right fitting in with the masses or keeping up with the Jones so Debi the fighter seemed like a better choice, although at the time not the most popular one .

Debi Purcell Early Years and Childhood

You have achieved a lot so far in your career. What more are you looking to accomplish?
Well thank ya for that ! What I want to accomplish now more then anything, is spending as many moments as I can living my life in joy and experiencing as many new exciting things as possible. I like to explore the unknown and I apparently have a desire to pioneer new things vs following what most people think is worth doing at the time, not always the easiest path but seems to be my way. Yesterday MMA wasn’t popular, today it is, tomorrow who knows, so doing what makes me happy in the moment is pretty much the most important thing to me. It’s also very important for to me to inspire others to follow their passion & never give up no matter where it may lead them. How that translates to a career achievement I’m not exactly sure. (laughs)

What accomplishment are you most proud of? And why?

For being brave enough to do what makes me happy despite how it looks on the outside or anyone’s opinions of it. I am proud of going to school and learning HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning), Dc’s Mechanical as that was difficult for me but gave me a solid base on how energy works. For all the work I’ve done in MMA, I’m probably most proud of myself for never giving up when it seemed impossible for opportunities in the fight game & for creating opportunities for myself and others when there were seemingly none. I would say my greatest accomplishment thus far though ( and it took me a awfully long time) is realizing I don’t have to “be” or do anything to feel worthy, that I am just because I exist. We all are, it’s just difficult to see at times.

What can you tell us about www.fightergirls.com?

Well It was started 16 years ago ( I think) and was originally started as a space to help bring the women and promoters together in the sport. There was so few of us. I wanted to find fights for myself and for others and have a place for the women to unite, get news, share information & gossip (laughs). The site was rebuilt quite a few times and thanks to other fighters and people giving their time graciously we were able to be that source.

Interview Debi Purcell

My partner and best friend Chad and I exhausted a lot our finical resources throughout the years to keep it going, so I am just fortunate everyone helped so much and believed in it as much as me. I do believe it was instrumental in helping women’s MMA grow at the same pace as the men, as opposed to trailing far behind, that was always very important to me. Today it is becoming more of a store for the ever increasing Fighter girls apparel line, so although we still have news we are focusing mostly on the girls we sponsor and apparel. We work with some amazingly talented girls and women so I am especially grateful for them.

And what do you think about WMMA now, and how it is evolving so rapidly?

Well I am overjoyed that women are finally getting the same recognition and opportunities as the men. And I think the world is finally seeing it as just MMA as opposed to women’s MMA (laughs). I think its evolving rapidly because MMA in general is evolving rapidly.

Do you think women fighters will ever be seen as true MMA fighters and not sex symbols in all parts of the world?

I am only asking because of what happened with Miesha Tate vs Cat Zingano match that was supposed to be held in Sweden and was rescheduled because it was too sexual for the Swedish fans…
Yes of course, like I already said, even with the men there have been fighters fighting on the big show(s) because of marketability as opposed to being the best fighter deserving to be there. I think as a rule in general women in sports will always be noticed more if they are pretty and marketable aka sex symbols, but I don’t see a big deal in that actually. Only if they do not have the talent to back it up.

Interview Debi Purcell MMA Pioneer
Interview Debi Purcell MMA Pioneer

Interview Debi Purcell

What is different about MMA (mens and women’s) then some other sports is that it’s not always the best competing against the best, a lot of it is who you know, how marketable you are, etc. This can make it disheartening for professionals who put their life into something never knowing if they will be able to make it strictly on their ability and dedication, and that I find utterly ridiculous. As far as the fight you’re talking about I hadn’t heard about that. But my guess is, there is more to the story then it just being to sexual for swedish fans, maybe they just prefer watching men sweat against and on top of each-other.

Who are you favoring in that match by the way? And why?
I do not pick favorites. I do have a incredible knack for calling fights, but usually just share with friends.

Which female/male fighters are you a fan off?

I am still a huge Chris Cyborg fan and think she is the best women fighter in the world today. I also respect Rhonda Rousey’s skills (she’s a good example of having skill and being marketable ) and I knew she’d be a star the first time I watched her fight.

You sometimes refer to yourself as ‘clothes freak”. I am curious to know the story behind that nick name.
HA! Well I’m just a “freak” by nature, that’s what people tell me anyway. I just really love clothes. I created my own style and made a lot of my own stuff when I was a teenager because I was broke and there wasn’t much sold in stores I liked. I did the same thing with Fighter Girls. I couldn’t find anything I liked to train or fight in so I just started designing stuff for myself. I will probably always have a passion for clothes and be a “clothes freak”

Interview Debi Purcell MMA Pioneer
Interview Debi Purcell MMA Pioneer

And your fighting nickname “Whiplash” and Queen of the cage?

Some guy was clowning me on the web years ago, so I coined it to make fun of myself & of the arm chair warrior. I also received the Queen of the cage when I was the first female Fighter for King Of The Cage Promotion

Any specific person you owe your success too?

In Life Kevin Moore, Chad Moechnig, my parents, Seth, Bashar. In MMA and life Marco Ruas, Jeremy Williams, Gennaro Hernandez, and all the kick ass women of MMA who’s dedication & integrity made possible what is now reality for a lot of people. Thank god I’ll never win an academy award I’d be up there thanking people for hours.

What do you do in your spare time… If you have any? (Laughs)

Well I just got back from doing ayahuscua in the jungle with the Ecuadorian shamans where I shared visions with an 83 year old shaman. Simply amazing! I thought nothing could top that, and then I went to Dominican Republic to swim with the humpback whales with a channeler group and was blown away all over again. The whales are our family and want to communicate with us (this is another area I want to explore more often). I also am planning to solo hike the pacific crest trail from Mexico to Canada 2700 miles, which I’m guessing will take me 3.5 months and spend as much time in nature and alone as possible mediating. Sounds stupid I know, but thats what I do in my spare time (laughs).

What future projects are you working on?

Doing my damnedest to not think about the future and stay in the “now”. Oh yeah and I’m writing a book about my experiences in MMA, it should be very funny and enlightening if anyone ever sees it. If not it’ll be funny and enlightening to me, HA! Also, I am heavy lucid dreamer & very intrigued with energy transformation, space time & parallel realities & think my linear future will have something to do with exploring that.

Final words?
I hope these are not my final words!

www.debipurcell.com Published on: Apr 16, 2013 @ 00:01

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Debi Purcell - Founder of Fighter Girls Debi Purcell

 

 

Debi Purcell MMA fighter
Whiplash! Queen of the cage
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Interviews female fighters news women's martial arts MMA

Interview Ashlee Evans-Smith MMA Fighter

Interview Ashlee Evans-Smith MMA Fighter

Interview Ashlee Evans-Smith Female Mixed Martial Arts are on the rise and so is amateur fighter Ashlee Evans-Smith. An up and coming fighter from sunny Southern California, Ashlee is dedicated to her sport with a drive and ambition for greatness. Down to earth and hard-working, it’s easy to fall in love with Ashlee and get behind her as a fan as we all have at Fighter Girls.

Interview Ashlee Evans-Smith

Female Mixed Martial Arts are on the rise and so is amateur fighter Ashlee Evans-Smith. An up and coming fighter from sunny Southern California, Ashlee is dedicated to her sport with a drive and ambition for greatness. Down to earth and hard-working, it’s easy to fall in love with Ashlee and get behind her as a fan as we all have at Fighter Girls. She will be fighting at the CFA womens tournament this weekend March 2nd vs Tori Adams. With Evans-Smith on the card, it’s sure to be an exciting fight. Ashlee Evans-Smith is one of the fresh new faces of women’s MMA and she’s here to fight!

Ashlee Evans-Smith female fighter
Ashlee Evans-Smith

About Ashlee Evens Smith

Fighter Girls: What type of fighting do you train in?

Ashlee: I train at a very well-rounded gym where we have Boxing ,Muay Thai, Jiu Jitsu and wrestling. I come from a wrestling background as well.

FG: How long have you been fighting?

A: 2 and half years.

FG: What got you interested in MMA/fighting?

A: I’ve always loved wrestling & had an aggressive nature. But it was after I graduated from college & was unsure of where to go after finishing my collegiate wrestling career that I had a chance meeting with a former Strikeforce champion, Eugene Jackson, up in the Bay Area. He took me under his wing & trained me for almost a year until I ended up moving down to Southern California.

FG: What is your favorite fighting style?

A: I love wrestling & always will. It will always be my first love, but now that I’ve moved into the pro ranks as an athlete, these Muay Thai knees & elbows are fun and dangerous!

Ashlee Evens Smith Fight Training

FG: What is a typical day of training for you like?

A: A typical day of training would be waking up around 7:30 AM, eating a good healthy breakfast and then heading to strength and conditioning at 9 AM. I would train anything from battling ropes sled push/pull, versa climber, kettle bells tire swings, polyometrics, medicine balls, shuttle runs… all depending on how far out from a fight I am.

After strength and conditioning I’d jump in the car and head straight to MMA training, where we would cover jiu jitsu, wrestling, boxing, Muay Thai or sparring – depending on the day the week.

If my schedule permits I might get a chance to do a double day and come back later that night for some one on one pad work and some extra cardio or grappling and then finish my night off with a shower and some yummy food and do it all over again the
next day!

FG: How do you feel as a woman in a male dominated sport?

A: I have been a woman in a male-dominated sport my entire life. At least it feels that way. Coming from a wrestling background where men “ruled the world” prepared me for a sport like mixed martial arts where men once again are “the president,” but women are slowly moving up in the ranks from secretary to treasurer now and If you look at the path that women’s MMA is taking who knows, we may be vice president next week 🙂

FG: What do you feel is the greatest hardship for women of the MMA?

A: People talk about how it’s hard for women in this sport to do certain things but I have to be honest and say that I must be one of the lucky ones who have been embraced by most people, gyms and organizations that I’ve come across. I think there
will always be haters out there but in my opinion the world wants women’s mixed martial arts to take off, it’s doing so right now and I can only see the world embracing us more and more.

Who Is Ashlee Evens Smith?

FG: Do you feel there are any advantages to being a woman in MMA?

A: Since WMMA is not as big as men’s I do see some advantages for the women right now.
I think it’s a little easier to get sponsors and to be put on certain promotions. Since the talent depth is still growing certain fighters may get an opportunity to be on a big card or fight for a title with an 0-0 record or little experience at all. It’s a great time to be a female fighter. The flood gates are opening.

FG: What has been your favorite/most exciting fight?

A: I love all my fights! I get the same rush of excitement & roller coaster of emotions every time. I learn from each, win or lose!

FG: What drives you to continue fighting and training?

A: I don’t know what else I would do if I didn’t compete. I love bettering myself in whatever sport I’m doing at the time & I can’t see myself not fighting.

FG: What does the future hold for you in the world of MMA?

A: The future is bright. As cliché as it sounds the world is my oyster. I know that if I keep training hard and performing in the cage I can have whatever I want. The same goes for anyone who puts their entire heart into something they love.

FG: As a fighter, you obviously have a very strict eating and workout routine. What is your cheat/guilty pleasure you allow yourself?

A: Oh man! I like to say that I am a “fat kid at heart” because man do I love food! (She laughs) My top three weaknesses would be:

1. Mexican food
2. Ice cream
3. Chocolate

FG: What is one thing people would be surprised to learn about you?

A: Um…I’m a punk-rock loving, non-meat eating atheist? …& I’m a Cancer? (She laughs)

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Published on: Feb 28, 2013 @ 23:33

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Jennifer Howe undefeated female MMA fighter

Jennifer Howe female fighter

Jennifer Howe undefeated female MMA fighter

Jennifer Howe is an undefeated female MMA fighter and here is a great interview with pro fighter Jennifer Howe. Every wonder what it’s like to be the only female member of one of the most successful MMA teams around, a team that includes two current UFC Champions, Jens Pulver and Matt Hughes, and one past UFC champion, Pat Militech?

Well, here’s your chance to find out. Here’s our interview with Jennifer Howe, the only female member of Team Extreme. This interview was done on 2/23/02. Here’s your chance to find out what one of the top female fighters out there has to say, so don’t miss this rare glimpse at this undefeated fighter. If you’re not familiar with Jennifer, you can check out her profile by clicking here.

About Jennifer Howe

FighterGirls A lot of people name you as one of the if not the top female fighter in the sport today, how do you feel about that?
Jennifer Howe What other people think isn’t so much a concern to me. I’m sure for every positive comment; there are many negative ones out there. I just love competing, not what others think about it.

Jennifer Howe

FG How long have you been with Walt Bayless?
JH I’ve been at Walt Bayless for five years.

FG How did it affect you and the people you train with when Walt left?
JH It’s Walt’s friendship that I miss the most. He taught me much more then just jiu-jitsu.

FG Do you still get to see and talk to him?
JH I haven’t seen much of him since he left, but we still talk.

FG Who is your trainer now?
JH Griffen Reynaud

FG Do you guys train with a gi?
JH No, that’s not a sport I’m interested in.

FG Who are some of the people that you train with?
JH Justin Ellison, Steven Comm, James Saccomano

FG Who is your manager?
JH Monte Cox

FG How long have you wanted to fight Judy Neff?
JH I’ve just been hoping to get a fight, no one person in particular.

FG Is there any girl you do not want to fight?
JH I don’t really know whose out there.

FG How do you feel about the all women’s Hook N Shoot card?
JH I feel this is a great opportunity for female fighters who are really serious about it.

FG If given the chance, would you like to go to Japan and fight?
JH Sure, If I could fit it in my schedule, I’d love to.

FG How long have you been boxing?
JH I’ve been boxing for two years.

FG How long in mma?
JH About two years.

FG Who was your hardest fight?
JH I respect all of my opponents.

FG How did it make you feel after training to fight 3 separate opponents in MN and then not fighting, did this discourage you?
JH Frustrated as always. I can understand someone pulling out because their injured, that makes sense, but it really bothers me when my opponent pulls out a couple of weeks before just because.

FG Have you found yourself in similar situations in the past?
JH You’ll find that in female competition, for every four you agree to do, one will happen.

FG How are you preparing for this fight?
JH The same as I always do.

FG You have been fighting a lot longer then most of the women out there, do you have any advice for the newer girls that are just getting started?
JH The only thing I would say is learn as much as you can from each opponent and have fun.

FG What’s your normal training schedule?
JH I train about four to five days a week, three hours each day. Each day a grapple, do combat conditioning, and box.

FG What is your favorite organization to fight in?
JH I love fighting in the Extreme Challenge. My opponents always show up. I haven’t had as much luck with the others. Also, the promoter (Monte Cox) isn’t flaky like some of the others I’ve met.

FG What do you think about females that hand pick their opponents?
JH I’ve never met one and I don’t pay to much attention to what’s said. You can’t believe everything you hear.

FG Are you a computer/internet user?
JH Once I graduated college I had no use for it anymore. My life is too busy to waste time surfing the net.

FG We never see you post on the Internet, is that because you do not go on to the net, or just because you want to avoid the drama?
JH I have a career and I’m a single mom with two boys. Every extra minute I have goes to training. When would I have time to post on the Internet? Besides, what does my training and competing have to do with how much I can talk. Listening to what everyone has to say only clouds your mind. It can make overconfident or help you to lose confidence in yourself.

FG What was the reason behind the big lay off from fighting you had a while back?
JH I was given a promotion at work, which demanded much more time from me. Once I got settled I realized I missed competing and got back into it.

FG Do you look at the upcoming Hook and Shoot card as anything other than another fight?
JH No. I’m just looking forward to competing.

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Published on: Feb 25, 2002 @ 18:27

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RISING STARS Jessica Bednark Fighter

RISING STARS Jessica Bednark Fighter
RISING STARS Jessica Bednark Fighter

RISING STARS Jessica Bednark Fighter

RISING STARS Jessica Bednark Fighter Name: Jessica Bednark
Record: 5-1 Pro MMA, 0-1 World Combat League, 0-1 Pro Boxing
Weight Class: 135, Jessica Bednark had my 1st two MMA fights at 145, fought spring 2008 in the WCL at 128
Fights Out of: St. Cloud, MN . There is a boxing gym in town that my boyfriend Jay and I use as a facility to train in. My boyfriend Jay has solid
wrestling skills (placed in State twice in high school in Minnesota) and has been kickboxing for about 5 years. He is 5’4, 140 lbs, so he is the same weight as me.

RISING STARS Jessica Bednark Fighter

I thought I had a harder work ethic than anyone I trained with until I met Jay. He pushes me hard every day, wearing me out and expecting me to not slow my pace or get sloppy. He is the best training partner I’ve ever had because he has such high expectations and is very impatient if I don’t meet them very quickly. Unlike a lot of guys, he seems oblivious to me being a girl and will hit me hard when we spar and be very rough when we wrestle and practice jiu-jitsu. There is nowhere to learn MMA in St. Cloud. When we have money (we’re catching up from being on disability) we drive a little over an hour to the cities (area) to train at Northway Gym (former UFC champ Dave Menne’s gym).

About Jessica Bednark

How did you get into fighting: I started karate at 13 years old. Despite it being American sport karate (point fighting) when we were not competing, we sparred with heavy contact at my karate school. I did well when I competed in point sparring, but I always thought that I would do better in full contact fighting (where there isn’t a break every time a kick or punch is landed) because I can take and deliver hard strikes. I didn’t even know what MMA was until I was 18.

When I was 19, I took my 1st MMA fight and won by rear naked choke in the 3rd round. A week later, I got ejected from a car, breaking my back (in addition to 4 bulging discs in my back) and tearing my rotator cuff in my left shoulder. I was on bed rest for a few months. I could not go back to work or training for almost a year. During my recovery, I decided that when I got better I was going to train for MMA and fight. In the spring of 2007,

I started going back to the gym. My back was too messed up at first to kick, but I boxed for a few months and slowly rehabilitated myself into being able to do everything again. About 2 months after I had been back in the gym, my 1 training partner – my boyfriend Jay – tore his ACL wrestling. What he was told was going to be a 3 week recovery turned into a 6 month recovery after he had surgery. Money was tight trying to catch up on bills from being on disability for so long, and now my boyfriend was making less than half of his usual paychecks.

We were strapped for money, and I didn’t think I was ready to fight (cause my ground game was non-existent), but I took a fight anyway. The girl I fought was 3-0 amateur and 3-0 pro. I knocked her out cold in the 3rd round. It didn’t pay much, but it made the car payment that month and lifted our spirits. I kept fighting and kept winning, despite feeling that I wasn’t getting the training I needed. So here I am now, busting my ass every day, trying to absorb what I can with anyone who will teach me, sparring with whoever walks in the gym every day, just trying to be faster and stronger and in better cardio shape than the next girl I fight.

Jessica Bednark Female Fighter

You mentioned fighting for Chuck Norris’ World Combat League, what was that experience like: I fought on the Miami Force team. Al Wichers, one of the refs for the WCL, refereed my second MMA fight in Wisconsin. I knocked the chick I fought out cold in the 3rd round and after the fight he told me I should fight for the WCL. This was September 2007 and the season for WCL started in about a month. I had just cut weight for the 1st time (only 7lbs) to make145. When he told me that I had to weigh in at 128 to fight, I didn’t think I could make it – I hadn’t been below 140 in years. My next fight (5 months later) was at 135. I cut from 150 again and weighed in at 133 and felt great during the fight.

Jessica Bednark Fight Training

I figured, what’s another 5 pounds, I can do that, so I called up Al and told him I wanted to fight for WCL the next season. He told me there was a girl that was injured on one team and they needed someone to fill her spot for the playoffs. A month later, I started for the Miami team in the playoffs. We fought the New York team. I fought Jennifer Santiago, who is ranked higher than any other chick in the WCL. Her back round is karate and boxing. She fights like a point fighter, a very good one. She likes to keep the distance and then come in and tag her opponents with a few quick strikes. She hates fighting in close. Every time I closed the distance, she fell on her butt (3 times in our 3 minute fight) and they’d just call it a slip and separate us. It kind of irritated me. We had an alright fight, it was close. We each landed a few good shots, but we blocked most of each other’s strikes. She got the win and I think she deserved it. I felt like I moved really slowly during that fight. The weight cut was rougher than I expected.

Jessica Bednark Fighting Weight

I cut from 142 to 126 (weighed in 2lbs under) in 4 days. I had trouble regaining my strength and keeping food down after that fight. This experience caused me to start dieting and eating better, and since that fight, I haven’t cut (meaning starving and dehydrating/sweating) more than 5 pounds for any fight. I would like to do WCL again, but I need to take some time and get used to maintaining a much lower weight. I like taking kickboxing and boxing matches because I think it makes my MMA fighting better, but I never care to have a big career as a kickboxer or boxer. It was great to be able to fight in the World Combat League, but MMA is my focus. I take a lot of pride in my MMA fighting, because I feel like it is more physically and mentally demanding than other kinds of fighting. Oh, back to the WCL- our team lost, so we were done for the season.

Jessica Bednark Fights

Toughest opponent to date: Nana Berto, because she’s the only person I’ve lost too. She is a very strong girl and she is aggressive on the feet and has very technical jiu-jitsu. I got choked in the 1st round. I don’t feel like I fought very well that fight – I wasn’t mentally focused – but regardless, she whooped my ass. Who would you most like to fight: I really don’t care. I’m not looking to go after any big names yet, I don’t feel like I’m at that level yet. Right now I am really focused on getting consistent training from Dave Menne’s gym and getting more experience. It was looking like

I was going to fight Tonya Evinger a month ago, but that fell through. I expect we’ll probably fight sometime in 2009. Kaitlin Young is right in Minnesota and I think we would put on a really entertaining fight if we fought. The problem is, I’ve yet to meet a promoter in Minnesota that pays decent – for MMA that is. Katlin Young and I were lined up to fight what would have been my second fight, but she withdrew to do the show that landed her a fight on Elite XC. I don’t expect to get a fight with her any time soon. She goes to a gym that has a lot of recognition and I don’t, so unless it’s a big show I doubt we’ll be fighting each other. My boyfriend wants me to get a fight with Sara Schnieder.

Jessica Bednark Up Coming Fights

Next fight: I think I have a boxing match in January, but it hasn’t been finalized yet. The next MMA fight I will have I believe will be January 31st for Combat USA. They put on really good shows and I really like the promoter. I think I will be fighting Karen Williams a second time. On Sept 29th, 2008, I TKOed her in 1 min 58 seconds into the 1st round. She didn’t do a damn thing in those 2 minutes to deserve a rematch. I came out, threw a few kicks and punches, landed every single one, she rushed in, took me down and threw a few little punches to my face that did no damage, immediately I turned her, got on top of her and dropped punches and elbows to her face for the next 1 ½ minutes.

I landed 4 elbows to her face in a row right before the ref stepped in and stopped it. She was tough, she was trying to fight out of it, but I don’t think she has the skills to take me. I don’t think she deserves a rematch. I don’t think she has anything for me and I think I’m going to manhandle her a second time in our next fight. The reason they think she deserves a rematch is because the fight was for a belt, so it was 12 – 2 minute rounds (the promoter thinks it’s more entertaining with the shorter rounds). So the ref stopped it 2 seconds before the end of the round, and a lot of people would have liked to see a second round. Plus, the fights are in Wisconsin, she’s from Wisconsin and undefeated (until then) and some people from Wisconsin think she’s tough just because they’ve seen her knock a couple chicks out. Doesn’t matter, our re-match won’t last long either.

Jessica Bednark Training

RISING STARS Jessica Bednark Fighter Training Regimen: I spar 5 to 6 days a week, primarily with my boyfriend, but with whoever is willing to spar – kickboxers, boxers, mixed martial artists, tae kwon do dudes, ect. We spar 5 min rounds, 15 second rest for over an hour– no breaks. I also roll about 3 days a week. 3 to 4 days a week I hit bags with heavy gloves and sometimes weights on my ankles to work endurance, technique and speed. In the mornings before school I run at least 5 miles (slowly increasing the miles). I lifted weights through most of my teenage years, but quit when I broke my back. I just resumed weightlifting this week, but haven’t come up with a real set plan for how I’m going to go about it, but I will keep it up because I feel like I’m getting old and losing my strength now that I just turned 22.

RISING STARS Jessica Bednark Fighter Other Hobbies/etc: I am going to school with the goal of becoming a physician’s assistant. I started out going for art, but changed my major because I don’t want to struggle so much to make money. I love to paint and draw, but rarely have time to do it. I live with my boyfriend who is a single father. I’ve been helping him raise his son since he was 17 months old and now he is 4. Not really a hobby, but very time consuming, but worth it. He is a great kid and comes to the gym with us while we train every day. They haven’t nailed down what he has yet, but it’s some form of asbergers – but he’s very high functioning. He has speech, physical and occupational therapy twice a week and goes to a special preschool 3 times a week to get him ready for regular preschool, so taking turns running him around to his appointments is a very big part of my life as well. Other than that I just like hanging out with my boys and seeing my family whenever I can.

RISING STARS Jessica Bednark Fighter Goal for 2009: Arrange my finances so that I can train at Dave Menne’s gym a few times every week. Also, I’d like to maintain a lower weight. I have been weighing about 142, fighting at 135 and I want to maintain 130, taking fights at 125 and 135.
Anything you want to add: It’s not on this website, but my pro record is 5-1 (my first fight was never reported and I’m sure it never will be – it was almost 3 years ago). But the fight I’m talking about is when I fought Karen Williams on Sept 29, 2008. I’m not sure if this is accurate (you guys would probably know better than anybody), but the promoter said that this fight was the 1st women’s MMA main event on a card where all the other fights on the card were guy fights. It was for a belt that was vacant prior to that.

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Published on: Jan 23, 2009 @ 17:17

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Interview Julie Kitchen Muay Thai Fighter

Interview Julie Kitchen Muay Thai Fighter

Interview Julie Kitchen Two of the UK’s biggest Muay Thai stars – Julie Kitchen and Amanda Kelly – will fight in Los Angeles on Dec. 1st as the co-main event at “Muay Thai in America: In Honor of the King”. The show is in celebration of the King of Thailand’s 85th birthday, and can be purchased on PPV on Direct TV and INDEMAND at 9:00 pm ET/6:00 pm PT.

About Julie Kitchen

Kitchen is currently 47-9-1 after a recent loss to Miriam Nakamoto. That fight was billed as one of the biggest in the history of women’s Muay Thai; FighterGirls caught up with Kitchen to see how training is going for her fight against Kelly, and how training has changed since her loss to Nakamoto.
FG: How is your training going?

Julie Kitchen female fighter
Julie Kitchen

Julie Kitchen Fight Training and Fight Record

Julie: I am no longer training with Nathan for my fights so I spent 10 days in Holland with “Enfusions” Edwin Van Os before flying out [to] Los Angeles where I am currently training with the amazing Manny Pacquiao and his entourage for my running/circuits, and Muay Thai with Paulo Tocha who played Jean Claude Van Dammes’ nemesis “Paco” in the film “Bloodsport”.

We have gelled very well as his techniques are similar to what I am used to, so we will see how it pans out. Paulo is a fantastic motivator so I enjoy my training more now but Nathan got me to where I am now and will still teach seminars with me next year.
FG: How has your training been different for Amanda Kelly rather than Miriam Nakamoto?
Julie: I always train to the best of my ability. There have been some hiccups both personal and professional. I like the fact I am considered the underdog in this fight just because of one loss; I haven’t lost 2 fights in a row since 2005.
FG: Are you back in California training and giving seminars? If so, when are your upcoming seminars?

Julie Kitchen Fight Seminar

Julie: We are doing a huge seminar tour of California in April 2013.I am so excited because we are bringing our twin daughters out as well who are fantastic fighters and Muay Thai enthusiasts. We will be offering seminars both in Muay Thai, following an amazing positive feedback from earlier this year, and also our new concept named tactical strike. The tactical strike seminar [is different from] the Muay Thai seminar as the target audience and student will be not only MMA based but will also be specifically aimed at the grappling expert. We are taking bookings now for April and are hoping to be fully booked by Christmas.

FG: What can fans expect when you step into the ring on Dec. 1st?
Julie: I will always perform and give the audience a show. I have honestly had enough of fighting and my final match is imminent but not sure if this one will be my last. It all depends on what emerges in the future. My focus/hunger/desire just isn’t in competition anymore at this point in time, due to the constant drain with [Muay Thai] politics. I loved the “good old days” when I would step into the ring scared and nervous but also excited and overwhelmed that I was facing someone I respected.

Germaine de Randarmine, Angie Parr, Karen Lynch, Karla Hood and also Miriam Nakamoto were all household favorites and just to be chosen to compete against them was an honor itself let alone if you took the win. Nowadays it’s about business, politics and “piggy backing” someone’s career to climb the ladder as quickly as possible.
In this fight I am defending a world title and not at my chosen weight; but I will be aiming to win nonetheless and silence the critics.
FG: Any other words for your fans?
Julie: Thank you to everyone who has supported me worldwide. I know I have the best supporters in the world and it means so much to me as well as having the best family behind me all the way. Other fighters can take a win or a belt off me but they cannot change a career with the result of one fight.

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Published on: Nov 27, 2012 @ 21:32

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Interviews Two Female MMA Fighters Raise Havoc

Interviews Two Female MMA Fighters Raise Havoc

Interviews Two Female MMA Fighters Raise Havoc We talk to local Helena, MT female fighters Becky Maxwell and Emily Green about fighting in their hometown, and their aspirations to take on the world. As MMA has grown, so has the inclusion of female fighters from across the United States. Even in the smaller cities, women want to test their combat skills. Two such amateur competitors are Becky Maxwell and Emily Green.

Interviews Two Female MMA Fighters Raise Havoc

Maxwell (1-0) is looking to impress this weekend at Fightforce MMA’s “Helena Havoc” card in Helena, MT. After a submission win her first time out last month, she will take on Canadian Kailee Ryan in an mma bout.

Becky Maxwell and Emily Green

On the same card, Green will be making her fighting debut, in a kickboxing contest verses Canadian Roberta Nikkle.

Both women took some time to talk to Fighter girls to talk about their young careers, getting started in the sport, and their aspirations for the future.

Interviews Two Female MMA Fighters Raise Havoc
Interviews Two Female MMA Fighters Raise Havoc

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Published on: Oct 28, 2010 @ 22:19

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Sarah Kaufman vs Kaitlin Young MMA Fight

Sarah Kaufman vs Kaitlin Young MMA Fight
Sarah Kaufman vs Kaitlin Young MMA Fight

Sarah Kaufman vs Kaitlin Young MMA Fight

Sarah Kaufman vs Kaitlin Young MMA Fight KANSAS CITY, Kan. (Aug. 27, 2012) – Former Strikeforce Women’s Bantamweight (135 pounds) Champion Sarah Kaufman (15-2) of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada will look to return to her winning ways when she faces off with prolific striker Kaitlin Young (7-6-1) of St. Louis Park, Minn. at the Invicta Fighting Championships world championship women’s Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) event at Memorial Hall in Kansas City on Saturday, Oct. 6.

Sarah Kaufman vs Kaitlin Young MMA Fight

Tickets for Invicta FC 3: Penne vs. Sugiyama, priced from $25, are on sale and can be purchased at Memorial Hall box office (913) 549-4853), online at Ticketmaster.com and InvictaFC.com and by phone at (800) 745-3000.

“Invicta FC has made huge waves for women in MMA over the last five months. It’s been amazing to watch so many of the top women all fight on the same card, so I’m looking forward to be a part of their next show,” said the 26-year-old Kaufman, who is looking to rebound from a first-round (:54) submission (armbar) defeat at the hands of undefeated Strikeforce champion Ronda Rousey.

“Kaitlin is a very strong 135 pounder,” said Kaufman. “She’s got a lot of height and is quite technical in many areas. I’m excited to get in there against her, especially in the wake of the worst performance of my career. I’m hungry to get back in there and prove why I’m ranked at the top of my weight class.”

Sarah Kaufman vs Kaitlin Young MMA Fight

A former professional dancer, Kaufman began training MMA after a martial arts studio opened underneath her dance studio seven years ago. Her competitive spirit pushed her to enter the fight world and, under trainer Adam Zugec, she reeled off victories in her first 12 professional bouts, defeating fellow former Strikeforce champion Miesha Tate as well as superstar Alexis Davis and submission ace Shayna Baszler along the way.

Like Kaufman, the 26-year-old Young will look to return to the win column following a second round (3:34) submission (rear-naked choke) loss at the hands of rising star Liz Carmouche on the last Invicta FC card on July 28.

“Sarah is a great fighter who has made a big name for herself in the sport, so I’m looking forward to the challenge,” said Young, who took up Tae Kwon Do at the age of 14 and earned her black belt in the discipline before discovering Muay Thai.

To date, Young has earned six of her seven professional wins by KO. In her third start, she scored a memorable KO on Tate with a head kick just 30 seconds into their matchup.

Sarah Kaufman vs Kaitlin Young MMA Fight

Young earned “Fight of the Night” honors at the inaugural Invicta FC event, slugging it out with Leslie Smith in a relentless, see-saw battle for three rounds before the fight was declared a majority draw.

In the Invicta FC 3 main event, superstar Jessica Penne (9-1) of Laguna Hills, Calif. will face off with undefeated phenom Naho “Sugi Rock” Sugiyama (8-0) of Kyoto, Japan at atomweight (105 pounds) in the first-ever Invicta FC women’s world title bout.

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu brown belt Shayna “The Queen of Spades” Baszler (14-7) of Sioux Falls, S.D. will return to action in the bantamweight co-main event and take on Invicta FC 2 winner Sarah “The Monster” D’Alelio (6-2) of San Jose, Calif.

Another Invicta FC 2 victor, Barb “Little Warrior” Honchak (6-2) of Bettendorf, Iowa, will collide with rising star and furious finisher Aisling “Ais The Bash” Daly (13-3) of Dublin, Ireland in a flyweight (125 pounds) contest.

Invicta FC will welcome one of the original pioneers of women’s MMA, submission expert Tara LaRosa (21-2) of Woodstown, N.J., who will lock horns at flyweight with Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu black belt Vanessa Porto (14-5) of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Leslie “The Peacemaker” Smith (3-2-1) of Pleasant Hill, Calif. will meet an opponent to be determined in a bantamweight matchup. Smith’s original opponent, Cat Zingano, has withdrawn from their scheduled matchup.

Michelle “The Karate Hottie” Waterson (9-3) of Albuquerque, N.M. will also make her first start under the Invicta FC banner against Lacey “The Ladie” Schuckman (7-5) of Lakewood, Colo. in an atom weight scrap.

In the leadoff main card bout, Julia “The Jewel” Budd (3-2) of Port Moody, Canada will meet Elaina “Beef” Maxwell (7-4) of San Jose, Calif. at featherweight (145 pounds).

The six-bout preliminary card will be topped by a strawweight (115 pounds) matchup between Carla Esparza (7-2) of Redondo Beach, Calif. and Lynn Alvarez (5-2) of Las Vegas.

Two undefeated prospects, Ashley Cummins (3-0) of St. Louis, MO. and Joanne Calderwood (3-0) of Glasgow, Scottland will collide at flyweight.

Amy Davis (3-3) of Idaho Falls, Idaho will face Stephanie Frausto (3-4) of Middletown, Ohio in an atomweight affair.

Fresh off her professional debut win at Invicta FC 2, Jessamyn Duke (1-0) of Richmond, Ky. will face unbeaten Marciea Allen (1-0) of Sioux Falls in a bantamweight battle.

Tecia Torres (0-0) of Fort Lauderdale, Fla. and Kaiyana Rain (0-0) of Los Angeles, Calif. will make their respective professional debuts against each other at strawweight.

Unbeaten Xtreme Couture prospect Katalina Malungahu (2-0) of Las Vegas, Nev. will battle an opponent to be determined at featherweight after her original opponent, Taylor Stratford, was forced to withdraw from the bout due to a knee injury.

About Invicta Fighting Championships:

Invicta Fighting Championships (www.invictafc.com) is a world championship Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) fight series dedicated to providing female athletes with a major platform to hone their skills on a consistent basis. Founded in 2012 by longtime MMA executive Shannon Knapp and sports aficionado Janet Martin, Invicta is committed to pioneering the future growth of women’s MMA by promoting the best possible matchups between female competitors and identifying and developing future superstars of the sport.

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Published on: Aug 28, 2012 @ 18:48

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Invicta FC MMA Fight Announces Stacked

Invicta FC MMA Fight Announces Stacked
Invicta FC MMA Fight Announces Stacked

Invicta FC MMA Fight Announces Stacked

Invicta FC MMA Fight Announces Stacked KANSAS CITY, Kan. (Aug. 15, 2012) – American phenom Jessica Penne (9-1) of Laguna Hills, Calif. will square off with undefeated Naho “Sugi Rock” Sugiyama (8-0) of Kyoto, Japan in the first-ever Invicta Fighting Championships title fight and atomweight (105 pounds) main event of the promotion’s third all-women’s Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) event at Memorial Hall in Kansas City, Kan. on Sat., Oct. 6.

Invicta FC MMA Fight Announces Stacked

The ticket on-sale date for the much-anticipated Invicta FC 3: Penne vs. Sugiyama event, featuring 13 professional bouts, will be announced soon.

After bringing fans to their feet in a hard-fought main event battle against Olympic Wrestling Silver Medalist Sara McMann, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu brown belt Shayna “The Queen of Spades” Baszler of Sioux Falls, S.D. will return to action in the bantamweight (135 pounds) co-main event and take on Invicta FC 2 winner Sarah “The Monster” D’Alelio (6-2) of San Jose, Calif.

Another Invicta FC 2 victor, Barb “Little Warrior” Honchak (6-2) of Bettendorf, Iowa will face off with rising star and furious finisher Aisling “Ais The Bash” Daly (13-3) of Dublin, Ireland in a super flyweight (125 pounds) contest.

Invicta FC will welcome one of the original pioneers of women’s MMA, submission expert Tara LaRosa (21-2) of Woodstown, N.J., who will lock horns at super flyweight with Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu black belt Vanessa Porto (14-5) of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Undefeated Cat “Alpha” Zingano (6-0) of Broomfield, Colo. will make her long-awaited Invicta FC debut against Leslie “The Peacemaker” Smith (3-2-1) of Pleasant Hill, Calif. in a bantamweight matchup and Michelle “The Karate Hottie” Waterson (9-3) of Albuquerque, N.M. will also make her first start under the Invicta FC banner against Lacey “The Ladie” Schuckman (7-5) of Lakewood, Colo. in an atomweight scrap.

Invicta FC MMA Fight Announces Stacked

In the leadoff main card bout, Julia “The Jewel” Budd (3-2) of Port Moody, Canada will meet Elaina “Beef” Maxwell (7-4) of San Jose, Calif.

Jessica Penne vs. Naho Sugiyama

The 29-year-old Jessica Penne will move to headlining status after a spectacular co-main event showing on Invicta FC’s inaugural card on April 28 when she stopped Lisa Ellis-Ward with an onslaught of punches in the third round (2:48) of their matchup shortly after breaking Ellis-Ward’s nose with a knee strike. A lifelong athlete, Penne was a competitive swimmer before stumbling upon a pair of boxing gloves and deciding to try her hand at MMA.

Naho Sugiyama will put her perfect record on the line in The United States for the first time since she began tearing through the ranks of professional competitors in Japan three years ago. On Dec. 17, 2011, the 34-year-old was crowned a champion in Japanese all-women’s promotion JEWELS after defeating two opponents – Kikuyo Ishikawa and Misaki Takimoto – in one night of action.

Shayna Baszler vs. Sarah D’Alelio

The charismatic, 32-year-old Shayna Baszler helped create an electric atmosphere at Memorial Hall on July 28 by engaging McMann in an all-out war for three rounds before losing a heartbreaking decision. A fearsome grappler, Baszler has earned the respect of the fight world by earning 13 of her 14 victories with submissions, including her patented hold that she dubbed the “shwing.”

Sarah D’Alelio, 31, pulled off a stunning upset at the Invicta FC event on July 28, tapping out Porto, a far more advanced Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu player with a beautifully executed reverse triangle armbar in the first round (3:16) of their meeting. To date, D’Alelio has notched five of her six wins by way of submission.

Barb Honchak vs. Aisling Daly

Barb Honchak turned in a dominant performance at Invicta FC 2, scoring a second round (1:22) TKO on Bethany Marshall with a barrage of punches to notch her sixth career win. A protégé of UFC veteran Steve Berger who recently relocated to Quad Cities, Iowa to train at Miletich Fighting Systems, the 32-year-old Honchak will look to secure her sixth consecutive victory.

The 24-year-old Daly is ranked amongst the top five competitors in the super flyweight division. She holds a purple belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and has earned 6 of her 13 career victories by way of submission and 5 by way of KO.

Tara LaRosa vs. Vanessa Porto

Tara LaRosa has been nearly unstoppable throughout her decade long professional MMA career, defeating a host of fellow superstars, including Baszler, Kelly Kobold and Alexis Davis. Between 2004 and 2009, the 34-year-old went unbeaten in 15 consecutive starts. LaRosa will seek her fourth straight win in her Invicta FC debut

Invicta FC MMA Fight Announces Stacked

Following her upset defeat at the hands of D’Alelio, which snapped a four-fight win streak, the 28-year-old Porto will look to regain her stride in the women’s super flyweight division. Trained by her husband, Pedro Iglesias, whom Porto met after walking into Iglesias’ gym for the first time in 2004, Porto has shown off her mastery of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu by earning 10 of her 14 career wins via submission.

Leslie Smith vs. Cat Zingano

Leslie Smith will return to the Invicta FC cage after a fractured wrist kept her on the sidelines from competing on the promotion’s second card on July 28. At the inaugural Invicta FC event on April 28, the 29-year-old Smith earned “Fight of the Night” honors for her brutal, toe-to-toe war with Kaitlin Young that was declared a draw after a three-round see-saw battle.

Zingano, a brilliant finisher who has earned four of her six career wins by way of either KO or submission, will enter the cage for the first time this year and look to extend her perfect record that she has been building since 2008. Trained by her husband, Professor Mauricio Zingano, the 30-year-old is a former collegiate wrestler who went on to win the 2007 World Jiu-Jitsu Championships before Invicta FC MMA Fight Announces Stacked

Michelle Waterson vs. Lacey Schuckman

Michelle Waterson is a 26-year-old student of famed MMA trainer Greg Jackson. A martial arts student since the age of 10, she holds a black belt in American Freestyle Karate and was a contestant on the Muay Thai-themed Fight Girls reality series on the Oxygen television network. On Jan. 21, Waterson ended a near two-year hiatus from competition, submitting Diana Rael with a rear-naked choke in the first round (2:12) of their matchup in Albuquerque.

Also a former Muay Thai fighter, the 24-year-old Schuckman showed the world that she is always game by accepting an Invicta FC 2 fight with undefeated JEWELS champion Ayaka Hamasaki on less than two weeks’ notice. Despite the short window of time that she had to prepare for the task, Schuckman, who has earned four of her seven career wins by way of submission, nearly pushed Hamasaki the distance of their bout before succumbing to a Hamasaki armbar with just 15 seconds remaining in the third and final round of their bout.

Julia Budd vs. Elaina Maxwell

The chiseled Budd, a 29-year-old lifelong athlete and budding fitness trainer, began her prize fighting career in the sport of Muay Thai where she chalked up several a number of notable wins, including one over superstar Gina Carano, before transitioning to MMA. She is a student of former UFC competitor and world-ranked Shooto fighter, Lance Gibson. Budd scored a first-round (3:49) TKO on Elina Nilsson with a combination of punches and elbow strikes at the Invicta FC 2 event on July 28.

Like Budd, the 33-year-old Maxwell boasts a stellar kickboxing resume. A three-time champion in San Shou rules kickboxing, she won the first American gold medal at the world Wushu (San Shou) Games in Macau, China in 2003. Maxwell reeled off her third straight MMA win on March 30, earning a unanimous decision over Ashley Sanchez in Kearney, Neb.

The six-bout preliminary card will be topped by a matchup between Carla Esparza (7-2) of Redondo Beach, Calif. and Lynn Alvarez (5-2) of Las Vegas, Nev.

Two undefeated prospects, Ashley Cummins (3-0) of St. Louis, MO. and Joanne Calderwood (3-0) of Glasgow, Scottland will collide at super flyweight.

Amy Davis (3-3) of Idaho Falls, Idaho will face Stephanie Frausto (3-4) of Middletown, Ohio in an atomweight affair.

Fresh off her professional debut win at Invicta FC 2, highly-touted Jessamyn Duke (1-0) of Richmond, Ky. will face unbeaten Marciea Allen (1-0) of Watertown, S.D. in a bantamweight battle.

Tecia Torres (0-0) of Fort Lauderdale, Fla. and Kaiyana Rain (0-0) of Los Angeles, Calif. will make their respective professional debuts against each other at flyweight.

Unbeaten Katalina Malungahu (2-0) of Las Vegas, Nev. will tangle with Taylor Stratford (0-0) of Woodland, Calif. in a featherweight (145 pounds) fight.

About Invicta Fighting Championships: Invicta FC MMA Fight Announces Stacked

Invicta Fighting Championships (www.invictafc.com) is a world championship Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) fight series dedicated to providing female athletes with a major platform to hone their skills on a consistent basis. Founded in 2012 by longtime MMA executive Shannon Knapp and sports aficionado Janet Martin, Invicta is committed to pioneering the future growth of women’s MMA by promoting the best possible matchups between female competitors and identifying and developing future superstars of the sport.

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Published on: Aug 23, 2012 @ 18:46

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Ashley Cummins – Cathy Snell Interviews

Ashley Cummins – Cathy Snell Interviews

Ashley Cummins – Cathy Snell Interviews Fighter girls was on hand to get comments from the opponents as they weighed-in for their semi-final battle. Ashley Cummins and Cathy Snell duke it out tonight for the right to face Gabrielle Lakoczky for the first ever Tuff-n-uff 115 pound title. Fightergirls was on hand to interview the two combatants as they prepare for the throw down.

Ashley Cummins – Cathy Snell Interviews

Pre-Fight Interview for Tuff-N-Uff 115# bout Cathy Snell & Ashley Cummins

Ashley Cummins - Cathy Snell Interviews
Ashley Cummins – Cathy Snell Interviews

About Cathy Snell Female Fighter

Cathy Snell Amateur Record: 0-1-0 (Win-Loss-Draw)

Team:

Age: 32
Sex: Female
Height: 5 Feet. 1 Inch(es).
Weight: 115 lbs.
Out of: NV

About Ashley Cummins Female Fighter

Ashley Cummins fight stats

BIRTHDAY: 1987-08-02
AGE: 28 Country USA ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI
UNITED STATES
HEIGHT
5’3″
160.02 CM WEIGHT
116 LBS
52.62 KG ASSOCIATION:
STEVE BERGER’S MMA
CLASS: STRAWWEIGHT
WINS
3 0 KO/TKO (0%) 1 SUBMISSIONS (33%) 2 DECISIONS (67%)

3 Losses

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Published on: Apr 23, 2010 @ 18:06

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